Saturday, November 25, 2017  |

News

Wisaskil Wangek scores senational 4th-round KO of Roman Gonzalez to retain title

Wisaksil Wangek clips Roman Gonzalez with a wicked right hook en route to KOing the Nicaraguan legend. Photo / @HBOBoxing
09
Sep

CARSON, Calif. — It was a sight that was hard to believe.

After 46 bouts of brilliance, Roman Gonzalez was out, flat on his back, staring up at the lights.

His girlfriend, Sofia, quickly ran from the crowd at StubHub Center in horror.

It was all over. Not just his status as one of the five best pound-for-pound fighters in the world. But in all likelihood, his relevancy as a top boxer at all.

Wisaskil Wangek topped “Chocolatito” in March, but that was via controversial decision. This time, the Thai fighter left no doubt with a pair of knockdowns in Round 4 on Saturday, the last of which finished the fight in brutal fashion at 1:18.

Wangek, also known as Srisaket Sor Rungvisai, didn’t just retain his WBC junior bantamweight title in the HBO main event with his pulverizing right hooks. He proved that maybe he should be considered one of the best pound-for-pound boxers on the planet.

“I trained two months for the first fight. I trained four months for this one,” said Wangek (44-4-1, 40 knockouts), who is now mandated to face Juan Francisco Estrada, who won a WBC title-elimination bout against Carlos Cuadras on the undercard. “I knew I was going to knock him out.”

Gonzalez (46-2, 38 KOs) finally came to his senses and quickly exited the arena, too, a beaten man. Sure, he lost his perfect record in March, but he did so with the comforting knowledge that most fans and media members believed he won. This time?

“We were both trading punches,” Gonzalez said. “His were a little bit harder and they caught me. I was little hurt on the second knockdown, but I’m OK now. I congratulate the champ.”

That’s the reality Gonzalez now faces, one where he isn’t the champ, a designation he carried proudly for more than nine years. The Nicaraguan’s hero, fellow countryman and hall of famer Alexis Arguello, never competed for a world title again after suffering a second loss to rival Aaron Pryor inside the distance in 1983.

Will Gonzalez ever return to prominence? Or does Wangek simply possesses the elixir to solve a fighter who will go down in the annals of boxing lore as one of it’s all-time great little guys?

“I think it’s just a bad style matchup for Chocolatito,” Gonzalez’s American promoter, K2’s Tom Loeffler, told RingTV.com. “We’ll have to see what his team would like to do (regarding his future). I think it could be a situation where Chocolatito could beat every fighter in the division except Sor Rungvisai.”

Perhaps that will prove true, but make no mistake: Gonzalez isn’t the same fighter he once was.

At 30 years old, he’s now fighting 10 pounds above the weight he captured his first title in. His power? Not nearly as effective. And even in victories over fighters like Carlos Cuadras and Brian Viloria, Gonzalez absorbed a lot of punishment during those taxing affairs.

The second meeting with Wangek was shaping up to be another one. In fact, it was brutal until Wangek suddenly put an end to the festivities with his second devastating right hook on the jaw.

The former four-division champion bravely rose from the canvas after Wangek planted him there with the first right hook. But even to that point, Wangek had invested to the body early with plenty of thunderous right hooks and clearly won the first three rounds.

How long could Gonzalez withstand those kind of shots to the midsection while still conserving energy down the stretch? We never found out.

Gonzalez also was spared all the cuts and bruises he suffered from head collisions.

Head butts and lots of ’em dominated the first bout. The rematch wasn’t even one round in when Wangek’s noggin collided with Gonzalez again, and he immediately pleaded with referee Tom Taylor to intervene. Rungvisai, a southpaw, was always going to make for clashes of heads with an orthodox fighter, but Gonzalez insisted then that the Thai fighter was leading with his head.

Many observers believed all the blood smeared across Gonzalez’s face was a big impression to judges, who surprisingly saw the fight for Wangek.

It didn’t matter this time. That first head butt was the last. And there would be no doubt who the better man was.

Wangek began his career 1-3-1 when he had a moment of clarity: he could one day become an elite fighter, if only he dedicated himself completely. He did so while working as a trash collector in Bangkok, sometimes grabbing scraps for meals. Now, at age 30, the dream is reality. It’s time to give Wangek his due as one of the best in the world regardless of weight.

“People say when you become a champion you elevate your game,” Loeffler said. “And that’s exactly what he did tonight. When you can beat the No. 1 pound-for-pound fighter twice, you have to consider him at the top of the sport.”

But Gonzalez? He’s headed in a much different direction, if we indeed ever see him again at all. But what a ride it was.

 

Mike Coppinger is the Senior Writer for RingTV.com. Follow him on Twitter: @MikeCoppinger

  • Chris Stans

    I’ve only been watching boxing for a few years now, so I’m still not used to seeing past elites take Ls at the tail end of their career

    • Carlos

      I have been a fan for 40+yrs and you never get used to seeing an elite fighter stay too long, boxing is vicious that way. All of the legends get brutalized at the end. Ail vs. Holmes was horrible. I hated Holmes for that beating he put on Ali for a long time, and funny enough I almost cried when Tyson KO’ed Holmes to end his career.

      • Orca

        Yeah, you always think ‘this guy will be different and walk away at the right time’ Rarely happens to say the least. It blows my mind that RJJ is still fighting and getting beatings.

      • Julio

        We all need the rude awakening at some point in our lives don’t we?

        • Carlos

          what they need is a manager that is looking out for the fighter and not themselves. Roy Jones Jr. is the best example right now. he gets KO’ed when the wind blows, that definitely can’t be good for his long term health. would not like to see another Ali situation, how could any amount of money be worth that kind of life.

          • Julio

            That sounds well and good in theory, but as we all know, no one can make decisions for you. You need to bang your head to the wall yourself a few times to realize when its over.

  • Cashtime

    I called this one. Don’t know what the controversy was on the first fight because you could see Wisa was stronger and rougher. Moving up in weight in the very lower divisions is a sure suicide risk. Hate to see Choco go out like that and props for him showing more balls to move up in weight and fight a REAL fighter unlike GGG and Lomo who slap around worn out former champs and showboat to the crowd when in mismatches (LOMO) no class…

    • Charlie U.

      A champion lands almost two hundred punches more than his opponent and loses and you don’t see what the controversy is?? Gotcha.

    • ceylon mooney

      what? really? gonzales won that fight and, in a division where folks throw a lot of punches, set a record for landing power shots. gonzales wins 10-2 (maybe 9-3), and the judges rule against him–thats kinda a big deal.

    • william ellis

      I had the first fight 8-4 for Gonzalez. An excellent fight, and pretty close, with the knockdown, but not that hard to score.

      • ceylon mooney

        ah crap i never rewatched horn-pacquiao!

        • william ellis

          It’s fine – whenever you do, let me know – it is a good fight to watch.

  • Nixtradamus

    I’ve been saying it for years: Chocolatito is not nearly as good as HBO sold him to gullible fight fans. A good boxer? Yes. Top 10 P4P? Not even close.

    Next one exposed will be Lomanchenko – top P4P boxers don’t go life and death with Orlando Salido and don’t struggle to knock out guys like Marriaga (or whatever name the Colombian opponent had).

    HBO creates these BS fighters by hyping their accomplishments.

    What did Chocolatito show? Lost to Cuadras, lost twice to this guy. So what great fighters did he beat? Arroyo! Lol

    • ceylon mooney

      he beat rungsvisai the first fight 9-3 or 10-2, set a record for power shots landed…

      • Floridastorm

        Gonzalez lost the first fight unless you want to dispute how three judges voted. It may be your opinion that Gonzalez won. But, it is meaningless. Gonzalez was knocked down and nearly didn’t get up in the first fight. He also took a whole load of punishment. Although Gonzalez threw more punches they were not affecting Rungvisai. Rungvisai was connecting with harder and more precise punches. The 2nd fight showed that the first fight was not a fluke. Rungvisai is a former Muay Thai fighter who are some of the toughest fighters on the planet. As he stated, in the first fight he only trained for two months. For this fight he trained for four months. I respect Gonzalez for the champion he used to be. But, he was totally overmatched against Rungvisai.

        • ceylon mooney

          a robbery. gonz beat his ass. putlanded him with the harder and cleaner punches by about 200. set a record for power punches landed. gonz veat him like 10-2 or, if u were really impressed with eungvisai like i was, 9-3.

          not affecting him? oy vey. dont watch blundfolded next time.

          judges fucked him. its
          boxing.

    • Mitchell Nelms

      HBO didn’t sell him, his resume did. But whatever man, people see what they want to see and believe what they do and nothing will change that.

    • Nick Bannister

      Salido was his second fight, came in heavy and fought dirty, and some still thought Loma won. The guy was 396-1 with two Olympic gold medals as an amateur, and beat a seasoned pro like Russel Jr with little trouble in his third fight, and Walters and Rocky Martinez before his tenth. I think he needs a Garcia, Linares or Corrales before we start thinking of him at the top of the p4p lists, but he’s no hype job.

    • FLOMATARD

      Wow HBO would hire you as their media executive.

    • ceylon mooney

      dude his second pro fight come on

      and how would he fare now? easy work.

  • Spider Rico

    115 was too heavy for Choco, he should of stayed at 112 which was his limit. Still a warrior tho.

    • Nixtradamus

      Check his record: a bs record fighting bad or mediocre fighters. When he faced decent or semi- decent opposition, he lost.

      • ceylon mooney

        dude he beat estrada and cuadras cmon

        • Chris Stans

          Don’t bother, This guy has been anti Gonzales for a very long time

          • Nixtradamus

            Do yourself a favor and check Choxolatito’s record at boxrec.com. Check his opponents.

            Don’t just swallow the shit HBO sells you.

          • Chris Stans

            Who was he ducking? U fight the best in your weight class and if u can’t always get a big name, u destroy the best name available. That’s why ggg gets so much respect. If u run up weight looking for a p4p opponent, you’ll get killed.

          • Nixtradamus

            Yep. You become a P4P boxer by beating taxi drivers and when someone calls you on it, you say “but that was the best available opposition!”.

            Nice argument on your part!!!

          • Chris Stans

            U sound like classic dummygraphic

          • Nick Bannister

            Louis, Marciano, Robinson, Ali, Leonard and any great you mention fought a mix of great to poor fighters. You judge a fighter on their best wins not the average level of their opponents. Gonzalez does pretty well with Estrada, Viloria, Cuadras, Takayama and Yaegashi

          • Ain’t no dinos in Holy books

            Gonzalez is the best sub 122lb fighter since Ricardo Lopez. Some fans might not think that’s a big deal, but the tiny guys are often far less protected than their larger peers. Patchy records, but they’ve been matched tough and are good fighters.
            I think Gonzalez has been wonderful to watch for the past 9 years or so, but his time is most definitely over.

          • Larry Connor

            Ward went up in weight hunting, Brooks went up in weight hunting. That’s what true elite fighters do

          • Chris Stans

            Are u kidding? Ward has only gone up one weight, Kell jumped up two and got his skull broken. This is Gonzales third time moving up and unlike the above mentioned, his style sucks for it

          • Koninbeor

            Ward didn’t go up weight hunting, he couldn’t make 168 any longer. Rumors are that he’s having trouble making 175. Now, to Ward’s credit, this doesn’t take away from his greatness. There isn’t a man at 175 who can whip him.

          • Mark Schoeman

            Or I could simply trust my eyes, since almost all his fights can be found online…..

        • Nixtradamus

          P4P guys don’t struggle with Cuadras and Estrada. Check his record – just two years ago Chocolatito was fighting Valentin Leon, who has 29 losses!!!!

          Check his record: he fought the same guys over and over to pad his stats. Sometimes they changed the name to make believe it was someone digfferent: Meza and Murillo, for example.

          Chocolatito is a good fighter, not the P4P boxer HBO sold to fans.

          • TMT LONDON-DA REAL OLA ODUSINA

            PREAAACHHH!!

          • Oasis-of-Reason

            I just want to point out to you that the two Murillos are from different countries, one from Mexico and the other from Nicaragua. They also each have a birthday listed on boxrec. I doubt they are the same person.

            The two Mezas have fought on the same card. boxrec.com/en/event/411543
            I also doubt they are the same person.

          • ceylon mooney

            those guys are real good fighters. i dont see a problem with a p4p guy struggling with a near-peer.

          • Mike M.

            You’re a retard and just need to stfu. Here is a real list of elite little men that Roman Gonzalez beat up on his way up in weight, he’s fought the best..and has nothing to prove or be ashamed of.

            Katsunari Takeyama (5 time world champ!!!), Juan Estrada (former unified WBO&WBA champ), Yutaka Niida (Former WBA titleholder, 7 straight defenses), Akira Yaegashi (unified titleholder & Lineal champ, also won titles in 3 weight divisions!!), Edgar Sosa (made 11 defenses of his WBC title!!), Brian Viloria (former unified titleholder in 2 divisions and earned his shot at choco), Carlos Cuadras (WBC champ,5 title defenses and mexican badass!!), Sor Rungvisia (unified champion and arguably the best in his division, and possible cross dresser!!).

            Those bouts with Meza and Murillo that you probably only glanced at for 5 seconds we’re his 8TH AND 9TH PRO BOUTS!!!!, wth are you talking about, Gonzalez is an “HBO hype job” my ass. You need to get your facts straight before talking crap about a fighter you know nothing about.

          • Larry Connor

            True story

        • Carlos

          I thought he lost the Estrada fight. And he avoided the rematch with Estrada. Cuadras put a real beating on him that he never recovered from. Sad to see him go out that way.

          • ceylon mooney

            seems a good number of people think that. i never actually watched it. thats one i just cant get around to seein, but i do think he avoided the rematch. he may be done now, but he looked great against rungvisai the first time. did he age right there in the ring?

            right now im damn impressed with estrada–i thought he might be too shopworn. as they said it wasnt morales-narrera, but damn it was good.

          • Julio

            I think the impact of losing his undefeated record after such a physically taxing fight (that most agree he won) affected Gonzalez both mentally and emotionally going into this rematch. He just looked like a shot fighter last night.

          • ceylon mooney

            dude i WISH i could disagree with you but it sure looked that way to me.

            it looked like rungvisai came there to retire gonz. he walked in there the winner. it was his ring. in addition, rungvisai was ON man. he looked great, and he looked pretty good the first time. i still wanted gonz to win, but man im happy to admit i was TOTLLY wrong about this fight. rungvisai TCB cool as shit.

            kinda reminds me of hearns-duran

          • william ellis

            I scored the Estrada fight a draw – but Gonzales did seem to win his rounds more decisively. Besides, Estrada is first–rate himself: no shame in being in a very close fight with him.

      • Giovanni Hordijk

        Don’t get me wrong, i think Gonzalez was a HBO hype job but Rungvisai’s record is even way more decieving. He fought alot of fighters at their debut in the last few years and fights with losing records. I think Gonzalez went up too high and Rungvisai exposed this. Don’t rate him as one of the best in the division yet because Inoue is in a different league. I also think other fighters will give him problems, just like Cuadras did years earlier.

        • Conrad

          Srisaket is a typical Thai fighter. Feasts on nobodies, kids making their debuts, guys with losing records, taxi drivers, school teachers etc. Then occasionally fights a big fight and loses (Cuadras) So its hard to tell his real level, but two wins over Roman Gonzalez you have to give him his due

        • Mike M.

          I’m gonna post this again for you morons, cause you clearly know nothing about the lower weight divisions if you think this is a list of taxi drivers, that “hype job” made short work of some of these elite little men, or made it look easy.

          Katsunari Takeyama (5 time world champ), Juan Estrada (former unified
          WBO&WBA champ), Yutaka Niida (Former WBA titleholder, 7 straight
          defenses), Akira Yaegashi (unified titleholder & Lineal champ, also
          won titles in 3 weight divisions), Edgar Sosa (made 11 defenses of his
          WBC title), Brian Viloria (former unified titleholder in 2 divisions
          and earned his shot at choco), Carlos Cuadras (WBC champ,5 title
          defenses), Sor Rungvisia (unified champion).

          • RayK

            Nice!! Seriously though, I think you and every other knowledgeable poster/normal person would be better off not rising to such shit! If you get what I’m saying?!

          • Mike M.

            Yeah I know. I’m just easily triggered after being forced to see what was done to Chocolatito. First my man Bhop now this!!..it has to stop!!!

      • MontyCircus

        BoxRec had him ranked #5 P4P. I’m pretty sure The Ring, TBRB, ESPN, all had him #1 P4P, if not then definitely thereabouts.

        Niida TKO4 in Japan for his first title. Niida going into the fight had made 7-straight title defenses.
        Takayama UD12 in Japan. 5-time world champion.
        Estrada UD12, unified champion defended the WBA and WBO Flyweight titles 5-straight times before vacating and moving up. Defeated Viloria, Melindo, Segura, Cuadras.
        Yaegashi TKO9 in Japan. 3-time world champion in 3 weight classes. Had 3-straight title defenses going in.
        Sosa TKO2. Made 10-straight title defenses at Light Fly.
        Viloria TKO9 in U.S. 3-time world champion. Defeated Solis, Segura, Marquez.
        Cuadras UD12. Going in had 5-straight title defenses for title won from Rungvisai, including win over Concepcion.

        What a bunch of bums.

        • Orca

          Good post man but you’re wasting your time.

        • Mike M.

          Lol I didn’t see this post but I more or less just posted the same thing, this guy’s an idiot just trolling for attention.

        • Teddy Reynoso

          Except for Estrada and Cuadras both of whom he barely beat, the other fighters you mentioned were either already been beaten before and/or no longer prime when he fought and beat them. Not an accurate gauge of greatness or superiority if you asked me. Note that Wangek lost to both Yaegashi and Cuadras at certain points of his career.

          • Mike M.

            Gonzalez started his career at 105 pounds. Estrada and Cuadras had been fighting their divisions for much longer than Gonzalez by the time he moved up and fought them, but he still beat them. He might have been matched tough but he produced some memorable fights. I don’t understand why fighters get docked points when they don’t completely destroy their opponents and still win.

            And so what if Wangek lost to Yaegashi and Cuadras?, these guys in lower weight divisions aren’t coddled or protected, undefeated records south of 115 are really rare. Yaegashi is an excellent boxer with very fast hands and good footwork. He blew Sor out in 3 rounds, Gonzalez broke him down to a 9th round tko. Yaegashi was coming off impressive unanimous decision victories over Oscar Blanquet, Edgar Sosa and a 9th round stoppage of Odilon Zaleta before being stopped by Gonzalez.

          • David Telfer

            Yeah they’re criticizing Gonzalez for not completely obliterating every opponent he’s ever faced, yet they’ll be jumping on Ward’s dick for his gift against Kovalev. Laughable really.

          • MontyCircus

            You can be a great fighter and have lost fights.

            Ali lost to Frasier. And yet he still went on to have a pretty good career. At least I’ve heard some people rate him.

      • Oasis-of-Reason

        I wouldn’t argue against the fact he has a lot of lower tier fighters on his resume, but Takayama, Niida, Wangek, Cuadras, Estrada, Sosa, Viloria and Yaegashi are all really good to great fighters and I thought he beat all of them aside from this rematch with Wangek. He is also clearly small for a jr bantamweight.

    • mikescapes

      So why did he weight 125 lbs. at fight time? Don’t listen to Max and Jim about his psychological state after the bad decision in the first fight. Nor about boxing at 115 lbs. Maybe he had to lose too much weight to qualify and was dried out. I don’t know exactly what happened, but he didn’t look confident when he got in the ring. And all that crap about revenge didn’t seem to be a factor. He’s a pro and should have put all that aside, but couldn’t for some reason. And the reason is not putting on weight. He fought very well, and maybe won, the first fight at the the same weight. You gain weight as you get older.

  • ceylon mooney

    i was SO totally wrong in my prediction.

    WOW. what a frickin beast rungvisai is!

    one of my favorite fighters got his ass beat, and, man, i am nuthin but impressed. man i expected that from inoue not rungvisai. spectacular!

    • Luis Rivera

      This Inoue might end up being a bit of a hype as well.

      • ceylon mooney

        well, i say his KO of narvaez said plenty–aybe our expectations were just too high? dudes ranked #50 in a much weaker weight class, so i thought itd be nasty part of me wish i didnt see that KO.

  • Son of God

    This only proves the first Rungvisai win wasn’t a fluke, and yet many still think Cho(k.o.)latito still is the p4p king smh.

    • Nixtradamus

      Most boxing fans just believe whatever shit HBO feeds them. In tonight’s fight, Lampley spent the first two rounds praising Chocolatito while he was being dominated by the opponent. As some point Chocolatito landed a single punch and Lampley said there was something “magical” in Chocolatito’s style.

      Lol

      • Son of God

        He’s magical alright so Rungvisai sent him to neverland. Lol

        • ceylon mooney

          he was on a mission. mission accomplished.

    • Giovanni Hordijk

      Exactly, Gonzalez went up too high since 115lbs has better quality opponents. Naoya Inoue seems the real deal while Gonzalez since way too overhyped. Also Rungvisai is gain but his record consists mostly of feasting on DEBUT fighters over the last years and fighters with losing records. I think Inoue doesn’t have too many problems with him if you ask me.

    • Rick

      Those were really cool glasses you had on Andre. You must be really smart.

      • Son of God

        Yeah. Just look at my CV it speaks volumes.

    • ceylon mooney

      it was a robbery. first fight wasnt close at all. great knockdown tho. but gonz beat his ass.

  • RayK

    I had a feeling in me waters when I saw pics of everyone posing before the fight except for SRVI!

    • Yutthapong Buachoom

      you r right and then SRVI punished them…..

      • RayK

        I’m happy for S(r)isaket…he seems like a good guy!

  • Charlie U.

    Chocolatito deserves a better ending to his career but I think he should call it quits. He’s been in a lot of wars and that KO was BRUTAL! Give the Thai fighter credit.That’s how you handle rematches of close fights…don’t leave any doubt!

    • Ain’t no dinos in Holy books

      Completely agree.

    • Nick Bannister

      Boxing almost never gives the ending a great fighter deserves. Either you take a hellacious beating like Leonard, Arguello or Ali, or you start losing to guys you would once have smoked like Morales and Hearns. The guys like Lewis, Marciano or Lopez who go out on top and with a quality win are few and far between.

    • Mike M.

      I got no love for that Thai [email protected][email protected]#%#@$% damn it!!, not after what he did to my man [email protected]#[email protected]$%#@$%^#^%

  • Julio

    Rungvisai just too big and strong for Gonzalez. Roman seemed completely out of his element since the very beginning.

    • ceylon mooney

      dont think thats the problem– gonz was great in the first match

      • Ain’t no dinos in Holy books

        He WAS great in the first fight. Turns out that was his last hurrah.

      • Julio

        You said it, “gonz was great in the first match” but on this one he simply looked overwhelmed by the power and strength of Rungvisai. If he has something left its gotta be at 112. At this weight class he is truly risking permanent damage.

  • Cashtime

    WISASKIL(LER) VS NAOYA pretty please!!!!!!

    • ceylon mooney

      man, im high on rungvisai. im not convinced inoue wins.

      • Giovanni Hordijk

        Inoue will win, i know records can be decieving but Rungvisai’s record doesn’t lie. Check it out. Alot of fighters fighting their DEBUT, big time losing records. If you take all the padding out of the record you will end up around 13 fights in which he fought like 2 or 3 quality opponents. And he didn’t win all of those fight. Don’t be too high on Rungvisai beating the shit out of hype HBO product Chocolatito. 115lbs was a bridge too far for Gonzalez. Inoue has way better skills and better fundamentals. Period.

        • Yutthapong Buachoom

          Inoue also fight with a fighter with losing record and not a good fighter either

          • ceylon mooney

            dude was on his bicycle, but i was thinking that too. he iced a FAR superior narvaez…what gives? did i just have too high expectation? when nieves didnt fold in half after the third left hood to the body i thought uh, whys he still standing?

      • Left Hook2

        I agree. Being a lefty who hits hard and isn’t afraid to use his head makes him extremely dangerous.

        • ceylon mooney

          and he dont care if you beat his ass. i mean, at the conclusion of that first match, dude looked fresh as a daisy. so what happens when SSR gets hit by inoue and doesnt wince? and what happens when the inoue takes that right hook?

    • Orca

      Me too.

    • Abraham E. Hernández

      I want too see WW vs Estrada first.

  • Charlie U.

    I keep wanting to get more technical nuggets and insight from Andre Ward when he’s the analyst, but he makes a lot of cookie cutter, obvious comments. Once again, I was left wishing Roy Jones was there.

    • ceylon mooney

      yea, ward didnt have much to offer.

    • joe blanco

      I agree Ward just spits out a bunch of platitudes, no in depth analysis. The problem is he has not improved over time.

      • Rick

        The networks keep making the mistake of giving a microphone to boxers that have no personality.

    • Rick

      But weren’t his glasses cool? They made him look so smart and sophisticated. Haha.

    • Steve Coleman

      I thought Ward did a great job. Ward was the expert on the panel (with Lampley, Kellerman and Lederman) and it showed. Andre was the only one who correctly pointed out the problems Chocolatito was having right after the first round, just after Lampley called it a sniff and scratch (or nip and tuck) round, implying that the round was even, which it certainly was not. Ward correctly pointed out that Roman did not look good at all in that first round. From that point on the others started agreeing with Andre, after it became obvious that Gonzalez was having problems. Ward said throughout the short fight that Sor Rungvisai was dominating.

      Ward also predicted, very early in the fight, exactly how the Estrada-Cuadras fight would go, correctly predicting that Estrada would come on in the 2nd half of the fight, and explaining exactly why he thought this would happen. Again, everyone ended up agreeing with him, after it became obvious that he was dead on point.

      Ward does have a dry personality, but he definitely knows his stuff, and in my eyes he was the only one on point throughout the night. Just because he is disliked by so many people should not take away from this. The job of the fighter is expert commentary, not winning personality contests.

      In general fighters like Ward, Malignaggi, Jones, Tarver, Sergio Mora (all fighters whose commentary I like) and trainers like Virgil Hunter show a lot more knowledge of boxing than the commentators (as they should), whereas the commentators have a much greater command of language and announcing skills. Lampley is a very skilled announcer, but frequently he cannot even see when punches are connecting or not. Even though he has the best seat in the house, he still misses a lot. And although it was not much of a fight, I thought that Al Bernstein did a horrible job on the Mayweather-McGregor fight, missing even the most obvious things, like Conor constantly taking Floyd’s back, instead interpreting it as Mayweather turning his back to Conor. Bernstein “I’ve never seen Floyd do that before.” Duh, because he’s not usually fighting MMA fighters who pivot around to get in back of you.

      These cats have seen so many fights over the years, that it’s amazing that they can still miss rather obvious things that are happening. In the case of Lampley and Lederman (and sometimes Kellerman), I think that bias and agenda play a big role in the way they call fights. On the other side of the street, I do think that Bernstein and Farhood try very hard to be objective. I also think that ESPN’s Joe Tessitore does a great job.

  • Oz

    Choco was great for Boxing, especially for the lighter weight class. Bringing $$$ to them, etc.
    It was sad to see Choco go out like that but that’s the business you’re in.

    As crowd was booing Sor Rungvisai, he didn’t give a rat arse, he came to win and took care of business and left no doubt this time. He was confident and he kicked arse.

  • First fight was a sham decision, but Chocolatito took so much punishment (and had clearly moved up too much in weight). I told my dad to expect the upset tonight, but not like this. That was shocking and I for one cannot wait to see the NEW Champ back in the ring.

    • Ain’t no dinos in Holy books

      Yeah, weird scenario entering this fight. I thought Choc actually enhanced his standing as the best in the game first time. Yet, as you say, he had to withstand a brutal battering from a bigger man and perhaps the writing was on the wall.
      I predicted Roman would regain the title but, in the back of my mind, wondered whether his body would allow it.
      This reminded me of Tarver KO 2 Jones.

      • Left Hook2

        Except Wangek didn’t close his eyes and pray before his punch!

    • Orca

      Good post.

    • Mike M.

      Choco looked off from the get. As deeply saddened as I am to see him go out on his back like that, it looked like it was heading for a tko victory in Sor’s favor. Gonzalez wasn’t fighting on his toes, he stood in the pocket trading hooks with a bigger man, didn’t move his head, there was hardly anything on his punches. RIP sweet prince….=( you deserved a better end.

      I can’t wait to see Inou destroy Rungvisia so I can tear Sor to shreds. There’s going to major hell to pay!

    • Uncle Sham

      First fight wasn’t a sham, Sor Rungvisai was clearly the stronger fighter. One of his punches is equal to like six of Chocolatito’s….it was just more obvious in this rematch

  • TMT LONDON-DA REAL OLA ODUSINA

    At 30 years old, he’s now fighting 10 pounds above the weight he captured his first title in. LOL ARE YOU SERIOUS! Ring mag are now trying to give excuses for their once self anointed p4p champion. How old was Floyd when he fought canelo and at what weight???

    The disappointment in the voice of Jim on HBO last night was palpable.

    • Rick

      Have you ever made one comment that wasn’t about Floyd? Why don’t you get off his nuts already.

      • TMT LONDON-DA REAL OLA ODUSINA

        Rick get off my nuts lol! Do you scroll up and down looking if I’ve commented?

    • Nixtradamus

      Funny how Lampley kept hyping Chocolatito during the first two rounds while he was being showered with hard punches by his opponent. As some point in the second round, Chocolatito lands a single punch and Lampley immediately announces Chocolatito getting out of his shell and starting to show his “magical” skill!

  • Fist_ti_cuffs

    Finally Keith Thurman will get his rightful spot on the P4P list.

    • Rick

      Fighting once a year?

      • Orca

        Yup. Great fighter letting his careers best years sail past. Hopefully 2018 is different.

        • Fist_ti_cuffs

          You do know that he’s injured……right?

          • Orca

            Yeah right now. The guy is just not busy enough. I’m just bored of these guys fighting once or twice a year.

          • Fist_ti_cuffs

            How many times did lil g, Canelo and lomo fight this year?

          • Orca

            Not enough. I’ve mentioned Lomachenko and his recent inactivity not that long ago here. You got a point? I’ve said a few times in these talk backs that I’m fed up of this fight once or twice mentality in boxing.

          • David Telfer

            Up until recently GGG was fighting 4 times a year. Ward, Thurman etc are lucky if they fight twice.

          • Fist_ti_cuffs

            You sound sooooooo stupid. Ever hear of boxrec? lil g hasn’t had 4 fights in one calendar year since 2013 and his competition was shit.

      • Fist_ti_cuffs

        He’s injured, but his resume say’s top 10.

        • ceylon mooney

          nowhere close

          • Fist_ti_cuffs

            But a 9-1 guy does……SMH

          • ceylon mooney

            lomchenko does. thurman has neither shown the skill anywhere near nor performed anywhere near the level of lomachenko. a 9-1 guy who beats gary russell jr then nicholas waters the way he did ranks WAY higher than “some time” thurman. barely beating porter was a good win, and it was his best by a country mile.

          • Fist_ti_cuffs

            Gary Russell was a prospect, and Walters name to fame was beating an overrated Donaire. Thurman beat Porter and Garcia who are both accomplished former Champions. You’re just spewing bullshit as usual. This hype job will be exposed shorty and then you’ll be on to the next Eastern European. SMH

          • ceylon mooney

            my bullshit is sooooooo much better than your analysis.

            so which eastern european is next? i wanta be ahead of the curve.

          • Fist_ti_cuffs

            Beterbiev, Usyk…….I could go on.

          • ceylon mooney

            i already like them, tho i aint seen much a beterbiev

            old news tho the buzz has lomg worn of on beterbiev and usyk is already champ.

            so whos next?

    • ceylon mooney

      uh…huh?

    • ceylon mooney

      yes. number 35 if ur generous.

  • Wales1

    Perhaps now dougie will shut up. He didn’t stop moaning about the first fight.

    • Nixtradamus

      Get ready for the silly excuses and transparent lies. Chocolatito was supposed to be in Mayweather’s class! What a joke…

  • ozzy

    Training 4 months for a contest doesn’t increase your punching power, if anything it’s likely to diminish it due to overtraining. Gonzalez was dropped in the first contest but could take all of the Thai’s other power shots, which he clearly could not do in the second fight. So has Gonzalez lost his ability to take a big punch or has Wangek been able to increase his power for this fight? If it’s the latter then how was he able to handily increase his punch power just when he needed it?

    Sad to see Gonzalez flat out like that, we should be grateful for being able to watch so many brilliant performances by him over the past few years.

  • Michel Desgrottes

    Wake up and I see this hype is finally over, idk why he kept moving up, probably felt pressured

    Was never invested tho, I don’t watch these lighter weights, I don’t watch little men fight

    People kill me when they say don’t watch women boxing but they’ll watch small men fight wtf

    • Rick

      Because smaller men and women are the same thing right? That’s ignorant.

      • Michel Desgrottes

        Who’s sayin they are the same thing, but in terms of size, I’m not watching 112-115lbs people fight, sue me

    • Orca

      You for real? Not a boxing fan in my book.

      • IanF69

        He’s a huge fan of Michel’s opinion.

      • Carlos

        He has no problem watching Fraudie Mayweather, who is a tiny man. any “man” that beats women is not even a man.

      • Michel Desgrottes

        Yea I’m not comparing myself to a professionally trained athlete, I’m talking about being entertained by them, small folks fighting doesn’t entertain me, but I do like seeing women box

        • Orca

          Your should check out Carbajal Vs Gonzalez 1.

        • FLOMATARD

          “Not a boxing fan in my book”

    • Charlie U.

      As big as you appear to be, I’d love to watch you step in the ring with one of these “little” men. My guess: you’d be winded after one minute and then they’d just tear you apart.

      • Michel Desgrottes

        Yea I’m not comparing myself to a professionally trained athlete, I’m talking about being entertained by them, small folks fighting doesn’t entertain me

    • FLOMATARD

      I watch sumo wrestling tho

  • Mike M.

    I love Gonzalez therefore I’m obligated to hate Rungvisai forever. Thai land sucks!!!!!!#$#%#^%$%&$%^&%^U

    • Yutthapong Buachoom

      Be like man, Better man win Ha Ha

      • Mike M.

        The man that won is probably a cross dresser.

  • Trump Gay Hitler.

    Cuadras ruined Choco, his face ws busted up badly by Cuadras and it was a matter lf time.

    • Julio

      I think the wear and tear and facing much bigger guys did him in.

  • Nixtradamus

    HBO’s hype job exposed: Chocolatito is a good fighter, not P4P material. His record is padded will all sorts of junk, including fighting the same terrible guys several times (they even altered the names to make believe it was different boxers). As recently as 2015, he was fighting a guy with 29 losses. Every time he faced a semi-decent fighter, he lost or went life-and-death. I mean, since when are Estrada and Cuadras anything but solid journeymen? They were hyped themselves in order to serve as Chocolatito’s “great opponents”.

    Check their records at boxrec.com.

    Once again, Chocolatito is a very good boxer, just not P4P material. Lampley can now wash his mouth with Listerine to get rid of Chocolatito’s dick smell. Can’t wait to hear modern-day slave Doug Fischer come up with excuses as to why the #1 P4P is not what he claims.

    All the retarded fans are now accepting the transparent excuse that it was age (even though he is no older than 30) or weight (even though guys like Mayweather, Duran, Paquiao, Delahoya and many others fought at much higher weights too) or grueling fights (why should the #1 P4P be in grueling fights with mediocre opposition?) or some other transparent lie.

    Hype exposed. Next one will be Lomachenko.

    • Nixtradamus

      Chocolatito was hyped exactly the same way HBO hyped Nonito Donaire. Remember? Solid fighters, but far from P4P material…

      • ceylon mooney

        hmn…funny…interesting comparison. addingg to that, rungvisai is more a darchinyan than a rigo

    • Orca

      Lolz. So much hate. Sucks to be you. Flyweight gets beaten at age 30 after 9 years a world champ and he’s exposed.

      • Nixtradamus

        No hate. Chocolatito is a good boxer. HBO’s hype of Chocolatito has been exposed: he is nowhere near P4P material. The record is out there at boxrec.com for anyone to see.

        Chocolatito is Donaire II – remember?

  • IanF69

    Better man won on the night….it doesn’t make Choco a bad fighter or a Champion with a padded record….some folk need to get a grip.

    • Julio

      This reminds me when Ivan Calderon was matched with Segura. Nearly identical scenario. The aging, battle tested magician finally unable to complete his last escaping act.

      • IanF69

        Good similarity, …but i just feel Choco has went too far up in weight…it finally bit him on the ass big style…for me he won the first fight but shit…no arguing over this….age stands still for no man…time to rethink his options and consider going back down in weight.Imo

        • Julio

          That was precisely his undoing. But Calderon also took on some pretty rugged guys like Cazares and had all sorts of trouble with his size and aggression. Gonzalez had too many accrued miles already and finally met his match. The Cuadras fight was a foretelling sign.

          • IanF69

            Your Knowledge of the smaller men is way better than mine…I just thought he would have been better staying at Light FW…Would he have ever been beaten..? Nope imo.

          • Julio

            With the current landscape, my guess is that had he stayed at 112, he might still be at the top of the heap.

          • ceylon mooney

            nietes-gonzales woulda been kick ass

          • william ellis

            Cuadras, despite losing to Gonzalez and Estrada, is still very good. He was very competitive with both (I noticed that Dan Rafael has him winning last night) and could give Wisaskil a run for his money.

          • Keano

            They have fought but it went to a technical decision as Wisaskil was apparently coming on strong http://boxrec.com/media/index.php?title=Fight:1877893

          • Julio

            I think the fight could have gone either way. Cuadras controlled the first half, and then Estrada pretty much did the same in the second with the knockdown being the difference maker.

          • David Telfer

            Cuadras didn’t control the first half IMO and Dan Rafael’s scorecard was a joke. I have no idea why he’s held in such high regard in the boxing world.

            Cuadras looked confused. Estrada had a gameplan and stuck to it, Cuadras was switching stances every 30 seconds and just couldn’t find a way that worked for him.

    • Orca

      Imagine if some of these bozos and the internet were around for Ali, Robinson etc. Ali exposed by Frazier and Robinson by Turpin.

      • philoe bedoe

        Well said……..

      • IanF69

        Yea, thank f**k it wasn’t…ok the guy has lost his last 2 but maybe he just went a division too far…no shame in that…but calling for him to retire and he fought bums is just a total lack of respect for an all out class fighter.

  • Stephen M

    I guess Gonzalez got old, he had nothing last night.

  • Colnef

    Those body punches were brutal.

  • Kim Loudon

    Not to nitpick, but his name is Wisaksil (title and article misspell his name). He IS the champ, after all.

    Good article, though :). Captures the solemn sadness of watching a great man become ordinary.

  • Fist_ti_cuffs

    Stop making excuses for a 30 year old who is in his prime and only moved up 10 lbs in his career. He was never who they said he was, but guys like me on this site said it all along. SMH

    • D Johnson

      Lol, Wow, great take Monday morning Joe…. The only thing over-rated are your boxing takes. Your post’s seriously read like tabloid fodder. Garbage🤢

      • Fist_ti_cuffs

        Sometimes the truth hurts. -_-

        • D Johnson

          Indeed

    • David Telfer

      Moving up 10 lbs in the lower weight is a hell of a lot different from moving up 10 lbs at a higher weight…of course you should know that already or you’re deliberately trolling.

      • Fist_ti_cuffs

        Your point is weak just like your perspective. 10lbs…….FOH!!

  • Cool Ichi

    Rungvisai vs Estrada and the winner takes on the winner of Inoue vs Cuadras

    • ceylon mooney

      still shocked inoue didnt waste nieves

  • Ciscostudent561

    Choco was great, but I think overrated. Idk how you can say the reason he lost was cause he went up in weight.. and wave a banner that he’s p4p #1. That doesn’t follow the flow of logic.

    DLH, Duran, Mayweather, Pac, Hearns.. list goes on and on, these guys won fights at much higher weight classes then they started, like p4p champ should. My point is don’t give a guy p4p status if hasn’t accomplished p4p things..

    I’m looking at you Loma. Guy is great, but he needs to accomplish more, or else we don’t know. I remember clowns around here comparing GGG to Hagler when GGG had yet to fight a top guy in his weight class, then DJ makes him look human. GGG is great but still human, so all of us lets calm down on the hype train of a p4p guy until he wins p4p matches.

    • Orca

      Being p4p champ has nothing to do with an ability to jump through weight classes imo. It means…. All things being equal, who is the best fighter in the world?

      • Steve Coleman

        I agree, and with Roman having holes in his game defensively, I doubt he would do well against skill sets like those of Crawford, Ward, etc., all other things being equal. So why was he P4P above those fighters? Roman struggled in his last 3 fights, but even after the way he looked after the Cuadras fight, HBO, ESPN and Ring still had him as #1 P4P. And a case can be made for him losing his fight with Estrada.

        • Orca

          I don’t think you can knock a guy off the top p4p spot because he had a competitive fight in a new weight division against a world champion making his 6th defense. I think Gonzalez was worthy of still being p4p1 after that fight. In retrospect, yeah, his star was fading and there were better fighters stepping in the ring at that time but I just didn’t see anyone doing more than he was doing to deserve that top spot. Right now, going off resume and current ability, Ward seems like the logical choice but I see better fighters than him. I think p4p is still up in the air at the moment.

          • Steve Coleman

            Fair enough. So who is better than Ward now, who has ‘proved’ it in the ring? I only see Crawford as having a shot, as he is now undisputed in his division. In my opinion the eye test is not enough (like when some had Kell Brook as the #1 welterweight based on how they thought he would match up with the other top welters in his division). Fighters should have to prove it in the ring against the other top fighters around their division. Also, Gonzalez has not looked great in arguably his last 4 fights. If anything he should’ve been rated higher earlier, when he was fighting at lighter weights. But those earlier fights were not broadcast on a major US network, so not as many people saw him then.

            Nevertheless, Roman was and is a great fighter, just not P4P #1 at the time HBO crowned him as #1, in my opinion. He was floating somewhere around #10 P4P and then HBO just suddenly put him at #1, out of nowhere, and ESPN and others followed HBO’s lead. It was like HBO was desperate for one of their fighters to be #1 (except for the obvious choices). I see the same tendency with HBO calling Lomachenko #1, it’s premature, as he has not proved it yet – not with only 10 fights (1 of them being a loss); versus Ward and Crawford’s 32 fights, without a loss, against tougher competition. We can ‘speculate’ that Lomachenko is the greatest fighter ever, but he has not accomplished enough in the ring to back that up. But you know, it’s all opinion anyway. Even still, I think that when networks like HBO put batteries in the fighters back, the fighters and their camps start to believe the hype, and it’s at that moment when the wheels usually come off. Let’s give cats like Lomachenko time to show everyone what level they are at. He has yet to even avenge his loss to Salido. I think Lomachenko should win that fight, but I want to see it, not speculate. Lomachenko’s negotiations always seem to break down (although this could be because of Klimas and/or Arum, who seem to overvalue Loma).

        • David Telfer

          At the same time you’ll probably get everyone cheerleading for Andre Ward even though most people thought he lost the first fight with Kovalev. Add that to the fact that he’s fought bums for the last 4/5 years and I can’t see how he should be at the top.

          • Steve Coleman

            Ward vs Kovalev 1 was controversial, they did it again to set the record straight and Ward closed the door. Gonzalez vs Sor Runvisai 1 was controversial, they did it again to set the record straight and Runvisai closed the door. Castillo vs Mayweather 1 was controversial, they did it again to set the record straight and Floyd closed the door. This is why rematches are made, to settle the score and remove the doubt as to who is the better fighter. Again, if Ward is not #1 now, fine. Then who should be #1 who has proved it in the ring more so than Andre? I say that only Terence Crawford has a claim, at this moment. So it’s either Ward-Crawford or Crawford-Ward as #1 and #2. Even Lomachenko, the cat whom HBO thinks is #1 P4P, said that he thought that Crawford was #1.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yuQfCCkurBI

          • David Telfer

            I’d say the second fight was controversial as well considering Ward stopped him by repeatedly punching him in the dick…I don’t care if Kovalev looked tired or if he was fading by that point – fact is, the ref didn’t do his job.

            If we’re talking about someone’s entire career then sure, Ward should be up there, but like I mentioned before…he’s fought one good fighter in 5+ years and beaten him controversially. If you’re including his Super Six wins then surely you’d have to include Pacquiao near the top of the list due to his career?

            I think P4P Crawford, Loma, GGG and until recently, Gonzalez were all better than Ward.

          • Steve Coleman

            Who has Loma beat that was even remotely as good as Kovalev, or even Sullivan Barrera, the Cuban that Ward beat before Kovalev? By the way, Kovalev was negotiating to fight Barrera, but his camp wisely decided to take on a softer touch, so they are now going to fight Shabranskyy, the cat that Barrera beat.

    • Dee Money

      I think you are missing out on how many people interpret P4P, at least in your call for moving weight classes. P4P means take what you are relative to the weight class you are fighting in, and compare it to what others are relative to their weight class.

      Lots of fighters are dominant in their weight class because of the physical attributes they carry; however, for some, that relative physical dominance doesnt carry as well when they move up in weight.

      That doesnt mean they are P4P worse, it means that they are more reliant on physical abilities that boxing skill. P4P isnt a measure of boxing skill though, as boxing is a sport and like all sports physical attributes play a role in overall ability.

      • Ciscostudent561

        good points, but I think i answered your points in the comment made above in response to someone else.

        • Dee Money

          Yeah, I see that. FWIW, my points weren’t made about Gonzalez specifically rather the general idea that P4P is based on one’s ability to move up in weight.

    • David Telfer

      So you think P4P is only based on weight and not skill? Or how many times someone can jump weight? Of course it plays a part but it’s about comparing the skill level of fighters who could never compete together due to obviously physical differences.

      • Ciscostudent561

        I don’t really think he was that skilled, from an all around stand point. Somebody else laid the argument down for me, so I’ll paste it here.

        “Not to get into semantics but I do not think he is. He is a masterfully gifted offensive dynamo whose high octane style was one of a kind. He was far from well rounded and did not have the athleticism that someone like Roy Jones had which let him get away with not being well rounded.”

        -tmac from badlefhook

        still a great fighter

  • learnmore

    Congrats to Srisaket & its good that fighters from other countries like Thailand are getting exposure from bigger markets. There is a good chance that Srisaket might be the best 115lb fighter, I thought Cuadras was lucky that they fight was cut short and Cuadras won a technical decision because I thought Srisaket was wearing him down & look the stronger when that fight was stopped. Srisaket v Estrada or Srisaket v Inoue, I probably lean towards Srisaket v Inoue being made because I’m not certain if HBO will still invest with Chocolatito losing & there is a good chance he will retire. If Yafai wins his defence vs Ishida, we may hopefully see Srisaket, Inoue, Estrada or Cuadras in the UK vs Yafai.

    • IanF69

      Good post.

  • Thunder Cat

    Nietes v Wisaskil Wangek is a good fight

  • David Arroyo

    The only good thing is that I don’t have to hear to the overblown appreciation for Gonzalez… He was solid but Fischer and his army of basement nerds idolized the man with religious fervor.
    I was never that impressed with his record, other than Cuadras and Estrada (who I think topped him) his opponents were meh…. He could have gone a bit longer had he committed to not gain 50 pounds of flab in between every fight.
    He gave us some great, entertaining fights so if he’s finished all the best to him and nothing to be ashamed of. Although I think he can make a solid comeback if he commits to take care of his body 365 days a year and not only for fights. Also, maybe adopt some extra defense and movement…

  • Teddy Reynoso

    Excuses. Roman like his once celebrated surname-sake Humberto Chiquita Gonzales shared some things in common: they both were great coming forward and dishing it out against their opponents whatever the level of competition was. But they both also were allergic to being roughed up in return and getting hurt or injured in head clashes intended or otherwise. They seemed extremely bothered at the sight of blood—their own. And they did not know what to do when they were the ones in deep trouble. They both were exposed by Asian fighters who because they were mostly fighting in the Orient were not known to American so called experts who usually dismissed them as either sure losses or at best mystery men. You in the West never learn from history in this division.

    • Julio

      Yes. I think that Gonzalez entered this fight psychologically affected. You could easily his dismay and dread after he and Rungvisai collided the first time and kept whining at the ref every single time after.

  • Teddy Reynoso

    In my post in Dougie’s Friday mailbag I already talked about the possibility of lightning striking twice in the case of Wangek-Gonzales because of a past precedent that of Pone Kingpetch and Pascual Perez back in the early 60s given almost the same scenario. Pone was not given a ghost of a chance to beat Perez but he outpointed him in their first fight and knocked him out in the second bout held in the USA.

  • Teddy Reynoso

    Boxing people in the USA especially must realize that Asians in general are better suited fighting in divisions from 105 lbs. to 140 lbs. because they are our natural weight classes given our normal physical stature or physique. Therefore they should not be hasty in conferring the best pound for pound honors especially in the flyweight classes to fighters from the West including South America without thorough tests and validations against the best top fighters from Asia, particularly the Philippines, Japan and Thailand, the traditional powers in the lower weight classes.

    • RayK

      Interesting…

  • David Stubbs

    Chocolatito was a beast but sooner or later with his style of boxing that outcome was inevitable…he was going to run into a bigger man. Typically those guys only know one way how to go out. Although he was a beast, boxing media was dead wrong to make him P4P#1. He’s up there but his P4P status is almost as bad as GGG being #2. Time has always been the ultimate truth serum.

    • David Telfer

      He was a 4 weight world champion beating everyone in his path…surely that’s exactly what the P4P rankings are for?

  • Larry Connor

    Just goes to show you that all of that (all action no defense) BS gets you nowhere, but knocked out!!! Little G had amazing offense, buuuuuuuuuut the defense was lacking. The stuff most people call “boring”.

    The sad thing is that now that he’s been knocked out, quite a few are saying that his career is now over. Smh. I’ve always said a great defense beats a great offense. #learntomoveyourhead

  • Pineappleman

    hope chocoman hang it up after this. thats just the way boxing goes. your time is up i guess.

  • Dan James

    I knew he would not make it from round 1. Even his ring walk was sooo gloomy,like he was mentally defeated! He also looked a little chubby like he was fighting at the wrong weight class. Wishing him all d best and complete restoration.

  • David Telfer

    I was rooting for Gonzalez but he looked nervous and almost defeated even before the bell rang . He looked strangely emotional during his intro.

    I think he won the first fight (narrowly) and I can see why he took the rematch but the Thai guy (not even gonna try write his name) is too big and strong for him. Style is just all wrong for Chocolatito at this point in his career.

    Some of the BS I’ve read on Twitter though is disgusting, saying he was always overrated and beat nobodies. Embarrassing.