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Gennady Golovkin mortal but victorious: Weekend Review

19
Mar

BIGGEST WINNER

Gennady Golovkin: I asked a colleague when it became clear mid-fight that Golovkin had his hands full with Daniel Jacobs on Saturday night whether it was because we overestimated Triple-G or underestimated Jacobs.

The answer? A little of both.

Jacobs is an excellent boxer and a big middleweight, as he technically rehydrated into a cruiserweight. No one should be surprised that he did well. At the same time, one would’ve expected the Triple-G who had attained god status to seize control of the fight at some point but it never happened.

A measured Golovkin groped for an advantage until the final bell, as did Jacbos. No one could be certain who had won until we heard the official scores, which was almost surrealistic given Golovkin’s domination over the years and 23 consecutive knockouts.

I thought each man fought carefully out of respect for the other – perhaps too carefully to accomplish something special – but I gave Golovkin the nod 114-113, six rounds each. That means, on my scorecard, Jacobs lost the fight because he was knocked down in the fourth round.

And I had no problem with the official scoring: 115-112, 115-112 and 114-113, all for Golovkin. I could see giving Triple-G seven rounds, which is still a close, competitive fight.

Now let me be clear about something: This really isn’t a knock on Golovkin (37-0, 33 knockouts) even though he seemed more human than ever. Jacobs represented by far the toughest test in his career and he passed it, which is the name of the game. Every fighter – even great ones – have nights like this.

And the struggle (if that’s what it was) could serve Golovkin going forward. The fight he and everyone else want is Canelo Alvarez, assuming Canelo gets past Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. on May 6 and Golovkin schedules and wins an interim fight.

Canelo and his handlers, who already have said repeatedly they are targeting a showdown with Triple-G in September, have to be more motivated than ever to make it happen after seeing how well Jacobs fared.

Indeed, I think most people will agree that a potential Golvokin-Canelo matchup is more fascinating now than it was before the opening bell Saturday.

 

BIGGEST LOSER

Daniel Jacobs: Jacobs (32-2, 29 KOs) fell just short of a career-defining victory but had a productive night nonetheless.

The “Miracle Man” fought the great Gennady Golovkin on roughly even terms, something no one else has even come close to doing. And many believe he did enough to win, which isn’t unreasonable. A number of rounds could’ve gone either way.

I thought Jacobs generally fought a smart fight, sticking and moving and unloading just enough to win some rounds. Had he been at least somewhat more aggressive – and somehow been able to avoid taking a debilitating punch – he might’ve had his hand raised.

I’m sure Jacobs really believes he did enough to win the fight, as he indicated in the ring afterward, but he also probably is kicking himself because he could’ve done more. He didn’t take many punches but he also didn’t land many, only 14.5 per round, according to CompuBox.

In the end, he still proved beyond doubt in defeat that he is one of the best fighters in the world, which makes him more marketable than ever.

I think an immediate rematch with Golovkin would do well after Saturday night but probably won’t happen because of the money Triple-G stands to make against Canelo, which is an enormous event.

Golovkin-Jacobs II could happen down the road, though. And, for now, Jacobs is in a strong position to get other big fights at middleweight and perhaps at super middleweight. He earned a tremendous amount of respect on Saturday. People are going to want to see how he does going forward.

 

BIGGEST WINNER II

Srisaket Sor Rungvisai: The Thais have an unusual way of scheduling fights, as if some professional matchups are sparring sessions.

Sor Rungvisai’s previous seven fights going into his showdown with Roman Gonzalez were six-rounders against nobodies in Thailand. The former 115-pound titleholder hadn’t engaged in a real fight since he stopped Jose Salgado in May 2015.

So we really didn’t know what to expect from him on the Golovkin-Jacobs undercard Saturday. What we got was an absolute beast.

Sor Rungvisai, who was stopped in his first two fights but never again, took an astounding number of power punches from Gonzalez, never blinked and never stopped attacking his gifted, more-noted opponent.

I scored the fight for Gonzalez (see the next entry) but, from a purely physical standpoint, Sor Rungvisai (42-4-1, 28 KOs) was impressive. I thought during the fight, “Who the hell is going to want to fight this guy after witnessing this?”

The reality is that many will want to fight him because he is now the WBC 115-pound titleholder for a second time. That and the fact that he beat the top fighter in the world pound-for-pound instantly make him one of the most important little men in the sport.

Maybe there is something to that Thai method of scheduling.

 

BIGGEST LOSER II

Roman Gonzalez: I thought Gonzalez won. I understand that Sor Rungvisai might’ve been slightly more aggressive than Chocolatito but I don’t think it was effective aggression, at least not as effective as that of the loser.

I thought Gonzalez (46-1, 38 KOs) battled valiantly through a first-round knockdown, repeated head-butts and two grisly cuts that gushed blood into his eyes to land the bigger, much-more-obvious punches in a vintage display of offensive prowess.

CompuBox stats, while far from definitive, back that up: Gonzalez outpunched (1,013-940) and outlanded Sor Rungvisai (441-284) overall, the latter figure being a wide margin.

Thus, I had Gonzalez winning a clear decision, 115-111, or eight rounds to four. I don’t think the official scoring – 113-113, 114-112 and 114-112, all for Sor Rungvisai – was outrageous but I was surprised when I heard the results.

I wish a fighter as great as Gonzalez, THE RING’s No. 1 fighter pound-for-pound, had not lost his perfect record by a controversial decision but, alas, this is boxing.

On a different subject, I don’t know where Gonzalez goes from here.

One thing that struck me about the fight on Saturday was that Gonzalez couldn’t hurt Sor Rungvisai even though he landed a junior bantamweight record 372 power punches. That reinforced the notion that Gonzalez might not belong at 115 pounds, where he is naturally smaller than his opponents. Many people had the same impression when Gonzalez struggled to beat Carlos Cuadras in September.

I can’t imagine him going back down to 112 at his age, almost 30. And who would he fight at flyweight? The big fights are at 115 for him.

I think Gonzalez will stay at junior bantamweight and give us at least a few more compelling battles like the one we saw against Sor Rungvisai. The first one might be against, well, Sor Rungvisai. Gonzalez certainly earned a rematch.

 

BEST SYSTEM

The weight issue in the Golovkin-Jacobs fight raised a familiar debate: day-before vs. same-day weigh-ins.

Jacobs was not allowed to fight for Triple-G’s IBF title because he refused a second weigh-in Saturday morning mandated by the sanctioning body, which allows middleweights to gain only 10 pounds overnight. Jacobs reportedly weighed as much as 180 pounds when he stepped into the ring, presumably around seven, eight pounds heavier than Golovkin.

So what’s preferable: Same-day weigh-ins that would preclude such an advantage or day-before weigh-ins that allow fighters to properly re-hydrate after the official Friday afternoon weigh-in?

There is no easy answer but I lean toward the current system. I think day-before weigh-ins serve their purpose: Fighters who deprive themselves of liquid to make weight – which has always been a part of boxing – are less vulnerable on fight night because they have time to fully re-hydrate.

Yes, the fact some fighters will have a weight advantage at fight time arguably creates a new safety risk. I look at it this way, though: One, both fighters have the same opportunity to re-hydrate; and two, the danger of dehydration supersedes weight advantages.

What are your thoughts on this difficult subject?

 

RABBIT PUNCHES

I’m pleased that a prospective super“fight” between Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Conor McGregor is gaining momentum, as Mayweather announced he is coming out of retirement. I chuckle every time I hear McGregor or UFC President Dana White suggest McGregor can beat Mayweather in a boxing match; he couldn’t beat a third-tier junior middleweight. The fact they’re trying is important, though; it means the promotion has begun. Of course, the principals could simply be playing self-promoting games and have no intention of actually making the fight. I think this is real, though. Once again, there is too much money on the table to let it slip away. I’m guessing that a formal announcement will come soon. And I’m in a no-lose situation. An inevitable victory by Mayweather would give boxing a victory over Mixed Martial Arts, which wouldn’t hurt the sport. And it wouldn’t break my heart if McGregor were to somehow upset Mayweather. This is good. … I thought Cuadras (36-1-1, 27 KOs) looked so-so in his unanimous-decision victory over David Carmona (20-4-5, 8 KOs) on the Golovkin-Jacobs card. That had a lot to do with Carmona, though. Cuadras outworked his countryman to build a lead but Carmona was resilient and did some of his own damage later in the fight. Cuadras won the 10-round fight 97-93, 97-93 and 96-94 but didn’t look like the fighter who gave Gonzalez so much trouble. … I was impressed with two rising fighters on display this past week: Ryan Martin and Sergiy Derevyanchenko. Martin (18-0, 11 KOs) dominated capable Bryant Cruz (17-2, 8 KOs) en route to an eight-round knockout on the Golovkin-Jacobs card, showcasing a formidable killer instinct and unusual athleticism. Derevyanchenko (10-0, 8 KOs) stopped Kemahl Russell (10-1, 8 KOs) in five rounds on Tuesday in Tunica, Mississippi. The 2008 Ukrainian Olympian closed the show in spectacular fashion after he hurt Russell. … Heavyweight prospect Adrian Granat (14-1, 13 KOs) was stopped in the first round by veteran Alexander Dimitrenko (40-3, 26 KOs) on Saturday in Malmo, Sweden, Granat’s home country. Don’t write Granat off. He walked directly into an enormous right hand that would’ve hurt anyone. It happens. And kudos to Dimitrenko, who pumped life into his career at 34 years old. He had been written off as a fringe contender, particularly after he was stopped by Joseph Parker last October.

Photo / Tom Hogan / K2 Promotions

  • not-so-much

    First off I think GGG won. It was a close bout I could score it 7-5 in rounds to GGG or 6-6 but the knock down would give it to GGG 114-113 at the very closest.

    I noticed GGG stopped trying to cut the ring off in the second half of the fight this allowed Jacobs to be an equal aggressor and the failure by GGG to cut the ring off is what allowed the match to go the full 12 rounds.

    However, my biggest issue was that Jacobs at 180lbs fighting for the middleweight (160lbs) title is beyond a joke. GGG was 10 lbs over as well but Jacobs with the bigger stature, height, reach and weight was always going to cause problems for GGG because Jacobs is not fighting as a middleweight he is fighting as a super-middleweight or light heavy.

    We will see GGG fight Billy Joe Saunders in Astana, Kazakhstan as part of the state sponsored Expo in June and GGG should win and take the WBO belt. At that point all the middleweight titles belong to GGG and if Canelo doesn’t want the fight after that then shame on Canelo and GoldenBoy for being cowards.

    • left hook

      Canelo doesn’t want to fight..so GGG should move up to SMW where he can fight good opposition and can become a two weight champ.

      • Colin Mc Flurry.

        It won’t be no cake walk at 168lb.
        Some of those dudes be 182-185lb on the night.

    • Steve Coleman

      Canelo has pretty much proven he does not want the fight. GGG will easily beat Saunders, who looked absolutely horrible in his last fight, that’s just a cash out fight for Saunders and basically a waste of time for fans, which is why it happens in Kazakhstan. After unifying (if you even count the WBO title as legit) GGG should do what he said he would do and give Jacobs a rematch. If not, then he should move up to fight better opposition, as Sanchez claimed they would do long ago (“we will fight anyone from 154 to 175”).

      • Decepticus

        175? Stop lying.

        • Steve Coleman

          154-175
          http://www.fightsaga.com/news/item/4171-Gennady-Golovkin-GGG-Team-draws-fire-from-Andre-Ward

          154-168:
          http://www.doghouseboxing.com/DHB/Tyler-080814.htm

          Abel was writing checks that Gennady’s ass could not cash. First it’s ‘anyone’, later it’s “oh, not him”. They would not go down to 154 to fight Lara or Canelo, only Floyd or Pac. They would not go to 168 or above to fight Ward or Kovalev, only Chavez Jr. or Froch.

          I didn’t say it, team GGG said it.

          • Decepticus

            It’s an Abel Sanchez quote. Here is the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tgv_rK0clDA
            Your link has Ward misquote Golovkin’s team, so it’s not a direct source. The video is. I don’t even think Ward said that. Whoever wrote that article took some “liberties” with the truth.

          • Steve Coleman

            Thanks, but Abel has done many interviews, this is just one of them, more recent, and it’s a completely different quote. In this video Abel is talking about no one goes 12 rounds with GGG from those weights.

            That is not the quote that I was referencing. I have seen Abel say that GGG can ‘beat anyone’ from 154-175 AND from 154-168 in different interviews.

            I don’t have time to search for all the videos out there (gotta go to work), but most boxing fans know what has been said. Here is one where GGG said he would fight anyone from 154-168, including Ward, and this was back when Ward was at 168 (before the Ward-Dawson fight, the video is a little out of sync):

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKGbttrMLag

      • Colin Mc Flurry.

        Believe me Canelo will take the fight.
        If it happens this year it’s 50/50

        Next may? I fancy Canelo to beat 36 year old GGG.

  • FullEnglish

    I had GGG winning too at 7 rounds to 5. Jacobs looked massive in there so hats off to GGG for the win. Sure, we all wanted another knockout but the W is important. Let’s hope he gets the Billy Joe Saunders fight next

  • mark elding

    Congratulations to Danny Jacobs who certainly surpassed my expectations in performing as well as he did.

    That being said, the fight night physical advantages that often arise for certain fighters from the modern 24 hour weigh in system cannot be understated or ignored. No-one should pour scorn on a natural, possibly great, middleweight battling on even terms with a highly skilled, world class light heavy, the division in which Jacobs would traditionally reside.

    With neither the fast twitch fibres of a prime Pacquiao, or the superlative finesse of Mayweather (who faced similar disadvantages in underrated displays against Margarito and Maidana respectively), I’m not sure that GGG’s stalking, clubbing style is really conducive to outclassing much bigger, talented opponents.

    Golovkin’s not on the level of Manny and Floyd (the two best fighters of the past 20 years in my opinion), but he is a spevial MIDDLEWEIGHT. It’s just a shame that the opportunity to significantly rehydrate so often distorts who the better fighter really is in the ring. And that’s a situation that might again rear it’s ugly head if and when GGG finally gets the 180lb+ Canelo in the ring.

    • Conrad

      I think it was less about size and more about GGG being reluctant to throw for whatever reason. He obviously still had the power to hurt Jacobs and it didn’t look like he was physically overwhelmed by him

      • mark elding

        He did appear reluctant I agree. But I always regard size as a factor in every fight where there is a discrepancy. It IS a factor. There are weight divisions for a reason and that line is so often blurred by the current system.
        I think Marvin Hagler would have had his hands full with a whole host of top light heavies of his era, let alone Michael Spinks.

        • left hook

          David KO Stevens couple of weeks ago. Everybody kept saying it was a spectacular knock out, even though the guy was almost 180 according to some reports. Size wasn’t an issue then so why is it an issue now.

        • left hook

          David KO Stevens couple of weeks ago. Everybody kept saying it was a spectacular knock out, even though the guy was almost 180 according to some reports. Size wasn’t an issue then so why is it an issue now.

          • Steve Coleman

            Exactly, and this Ryan Martin kid was way bigger than his opponent Bryant Cruz. And Terrence Crawford rehydrates from 140 to 155, close to 160 at times. To answer your question, it’s only an issue when people are looking for an excuse for the performance of their favorite fighter.

          • mark elding

            I’m not looking for an excuse. The size issue is ALWAYS on my mind, no matter who is fighting. 24 -30 hour weigh ins are a blight on modern boxing.

          • Ten Count Toronto

            Or when someone nearly gets killed for one reason or another, like Joey Gamache or Gerald McLellan… actually it should ALWAYS be an issue – the problem is, as with drugs, so many people are doing that if we talked about in every post fight, that would be all we ever talk about.

            A certain fatigue goes along with bringing up the obvious 30 times a week, it;s like getting worked up about texting behind the wheel, or campaign finance in politics.

            The usual mitigating factor is that in major fights BOTH guys usually doing it. Yeah Crawford was Jr. Middleweight, but do really doubt Molina & Postol weren;t just a couple of lbs behind him?

            But the real victims are the professional “opponents” or the past prime also-rans who are now booking one or two divisions above their in-shape weight facing the added danger of an opponent who is cheating down from an even higher weight class than the one in which they;re already mismatched!

          • Steve Coleman

            Good comment, but as far as I can remember, the results of the Nigel Benn vs. Gerald McClellan (2 c’s) fight was not because of weight (although McClellan weighed in 2 pounds below the super middleweight limit). Sometimes it’s about not stopping the fight soon enough, even among evenly matched opponents. Yes, people sometimes get killed in combat sports, actually in sports period, but it’s not always because of weight.

            Drugs have always been a problem and are another issue. I agree with you about the greater danger of the past prime opponents, or opponents who are clearly overmatched, but again this may have nothing to weight, although it’s more dangerous when there is a weight or size disparity, which happens most often in the heavyweight division where there are no weight limits.

          • mark elding

            I’m not everybody.

          • left hook

            I get u about about holyfield but that heavy weight division…no limit there. How come u didn’t say there was a weight issue with the Stevens KO but u saying it now with Golovkin.

          • mark elding

            I just didn’t choose to comment on that particular fight as it was not nearly as significant as GGG-Jacobs.

            I did, however, comment strongly post Martinez-Chavez jr about the similar weight issue. Everyone assumed Sergio would outclass jr, and he did for the most part. However, that weight advantage was a massive factor in Chavez staying in there, almost stopping Martinez late and effectively beginning the end of his career at the very top.

            Honestly, 24 hour + weigh ins alienate me more than any other issue in boxing. There are so many fights when I question whether the winner won because he was legitimately better, or just significantly bigger.

            For the record, I saw GGG-Jacobs as a 114-113 ‘swing’ fight either way.

          • left hook

            Well u say all that now. The truth is u didn’t comment on weight on other fights but chose to comment on GGG weight disadvantage. Comment on all weight issue that is unfair whether u like the fighter or not, so your comment can be fair and balance.

          • mark elding

            If I did that, my comments would get blocked by all because I’d come across as a broken record, constantly harping on about weight and body mass.

          • left hook

            Lol..OK fair enough.

          • Mitchell Nelms

            Most of us have, you should pay attention more.

          • left hook

            Oh trust me, I pay attention…I see the bias and how u allow some certain fighters get a pass and some don’t

          • Mauro Hermida

            After 11 rounds of domination, it appeared to me that Sergio didnt have any legs to stand on in the 12th. I thought he overtrained. He almost paid for it in the end.

          • Harry

            That’s not an issue, I agree: the real issue is that smaller GGG roughed up bigger Danny, dropped him, hurt him, had his face terribly swollen in the end and chased him all over the ring, bullying him.

          • Rick

            You just love arguing with people don’t you.

          • left hook

            Forget my arguing with people and stick to the topic. If u don’t have anything to say about the topic don’t reply. This forum is for debate and arguments..perhaps u didn’t know.

          • Standing8

            He’s a troll just like Lil Fisti

          • Fist_ti_cuffs

            Because they wanna believe that this guy is Superman when he’s more like Underdog. As he steps up the competition, expect losses and more nights just like Saturday. Oh, let’s see if he really wants to run that back. Me thinks not.

          • Mitchell Nelms

            Because some people like to shit on the accomplishments of others because they don’t fit their mold.

          • Fist_ti_cuffs

            Sounds good to me.

          • Mitchell Nelms

            Size, coupled with height and reach. I think most people are quick to point out size and weight advantages, even if they don’t affect the outcome of the fight.

            Jacobs has been knocked out and knocked down; the one factor that didn’t apply to Saturday’s fight was the fact that both of the men who dropped Jacob’s were tall, rangy fighters. They came in over or to the side of his guard from a higher vantage point.

          • left hook

            Your assessment is fair enough.

        • Brad McKain

          Jacobs made weight, it’s a non issue

        • Mauro Hermida

          Its not a stretch to believe that Jacobs hurt him, preferably to the body. Plus I dont think GGG has great stamina either.

      • ceylon mooney

        where was that body attack? saw it for a bit then … ?

      • ceylon mooney

        yea man

    • Giuseppe

      Agree+!

    • Stephen M

      I certainly won’t disagree with you about the weight question, but I thought that Jacobs footwork and defense kept him safe. I also thought that when he turned southpaw it took away Golovkin’s jab.

      And didn’t Murray have a significant weight advantage?

      • Ten Count Toronto

        The weight wasn’t as big an issue as it could have been if Jacobs was a more aggressive & physical fighter by both practice & temperament. Of course it was a factor in him staying so strong down the stretch, just as it helped Murray survive into the 11th. But it was ultimately Jacobs excellent use of height & ranginess to control the angles & distance that gave Golovkin more trouble than the weight.

        Both Murray & Jacobs were bigger than Golovking but Murray – like Lemieux & Stevens – was forced on the spot to box going backwards contrary to both his identity and skill set. Jacobs is much more a boxer by nature and expertise, what he did on Saturday was not such a departure for him other than the level on which he had to execute with little margin for error.

        That doesn’t minimize the seriousness and potential dangers of a system that encourages 15-20lb weight disparities as a general issue. If some of those Jacobs righ hands had been landing on a more shopworn 35 yer old who doesn’t have Golovkins chin and who maybe was a natural Jr. Middleweight, it could have been devastating.

        • Philip Matsikoudis

          I think if Jacobs was more aggressive he would have been knocked down more than the one time he was and in fact would have been down for the count.

    • ceylon mooney

      mayweather never fought margarito

      but good points

      • mark elding

        I know. I said Pac and Floyd fought Margarito and Maidana RESPECTIVELY.

        • ceylon mooney

          ah yea i somehow missed that

  • Conrad

    Like how the picture of GGG after the Kell Brook fight is used instead of one after last Saturday. GGG took more damage from Brook

  • Dominic Hopp

    About “Best System” and “The weight issue”.
    Remember Arturo Gatti vs Joey Gamache in 2000.
    The weight Limit was 141 pound. Gamache entered the ring with 145 pounds and Gatti with 160 pounds
    Gatti nearly killed Gamache und ended his career with this brutal knockout in the second round.

    • mark elding

      Arguably the scariest TKO of all time, and should have led to a serious discussion amongst all boxing commissions about the re-introduction of same day weigh ins.

    • Ten Count Toronto

      Gatti is a rpime example of the kind of scam that can be perpetrated by weight-laundering. You get a fairly unremarkable 19 year old future Weltherweight who can get down 130 f,or at least 15 minutes and match him against recently declining world class and then continue the pattern at 135 & 140 until the jig is finally up. He deals out a couple of damaging beatings with a 15-20 lb advantage but also takes a couple of brutal beatings from being weight drained against fighters who are really much better than him though smaller. Makes him enough of a draw to headline PPV’s and get into the HOF!

      But it didn’t come cheap, I believe those years of crazy weight fluctuation and fighting at times on an empty tank contributed to his physical and mental demise at a young age, Also the early years of facing far smaller opponents created delusions that he was big puncher and had great chin so he completely ignored defense – had he been competing in fair fights, he would have realized very early that his power & chin are barely average for Weltherweight and non-viable at 154, it might have made clear to him that he’s going nowhere in boxing unless he becomes a very responsble defensive fighter.

  • Billy ray cyrus

    Jacobs could have weighed 200lbs he is and will always be a 2nd tier fighter. Tommy hearns worst day as fighter saw him throwing missiles at hagglers bald head. I didn’t see ggg taking chances blah, blah or any of that other nonsense from last weeks column

    • mark elding

      Tommy gets there first against the GGG we saw Saturday night. No question about that.

      • Mauro Hermida

        Guys like Hagler and Monzon would completely wear out the version we saw last weekend.

  • stafano

    Controversy I love it because it creates interest? ( the great Angelo Dundee )

    I’m 42 years old. I’ve been watching Boxing for over 35 years.
    I consider myself a Historian of the sport.
    I’ve attended numerous live shows ( seen some great fighters ) watched all the available footage of the greats, have collected loads of books, magazines ( some rare one ) over the years. I have countless videos – DVDs. Boxing prints ( some real rare beauty’s ) some fantastic Boxing figurines ( some of my most treasured possessions ) at one time I had a folder with Whsmith, every month it would cost me over £20. The Ring, Ko, Boxing illustrated, Boxing monthly, Boxing news, World boxing, Boxing outlook. I was obsessed about the sport and wanted to learn as much about it as possible, especially the glorious history of the sport. The Ring was always my favourite – i couldn’t wait to get my hands on the next edition.

    Nowadays I prefer mostly reading and commenting on the Historical articles. I still watch the fighters I think have the potential to be special, but I prefer to watch their career unfold – before getting caught up in any possible Hype.

    GGG
    Is one of my favourite fighters of the current Era, I love his all action take no prisoners attitude, and his excellent conduct outside the ring.
    But I never got carried away with some people, going as far to call Him maybe the greatest middleweight of all time. ( a completely ludicrous claim ) I have far to much respect for the true 160lb Legends – Ketchel, Greb, Robinson, Monzon, Hagler Etc. These men beat great fighters – were involved in great fights. True greatness can only be measured by who you rub up against- fellow great fighters. GGG hasn’t had the dance partners so far ( no fault of his own ) non of his opposition will be getting close to the Hall of Fame.

    I scored Saturdays fight 115-114 to Jacobs ( 6-4-2 even ) I thought some rounds were very close I could easily have scored 2-3 rounds the other way, so I had no problem with the score card.

    Now every great fighter has a bad day at the office, this may have just been the case, we will see.
    I also think GGG at 35 is probably past his best. I’ve read people saying he will rule into his late 30s. ( never believed it for a minute ) pressure fighters can’t maintain their peak at that age – don’t take my word for it, over 100 years of boxing history as shown this to be the case.

    One weapon that will always be very valuable to Golovkin is the superb jab he has, – a real heavy accurate tool. the jab is the most important punch in the book ( unless your Roy jones. Speaking of Jones I couldn’t see GGG living with him )

    Another important point to make. Fighters who have such long and distinguished amateur pedigree, and turn professional in their mid 20s time goes by so quick.

    Can GGG go on to achieve True Greatness – time will tell
    And the hour is getting late.

    Same day weigh ins are the only fair way – weight classes being relevant.
    It’s the Boxer & trainers job to make sure they do this in the appropriate healthy manner – for gods sake there are more than enough weight division to go around.

    • not-so-much

      Many good points.

      I would argue if GGG equals or surpasses BHop’s unbeaten Middleweight series of defences then he should be considered a True Great.

      • mike

        For GGG to pass B Hop, he will probably need to beat Jacobs (check), Saunders, Canelo and then either Canelo or Jacobs again. If he can do that, he goes down as one of the best middleweights of all time. No questions asked.

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        • Mauro Hermida

          After watching this fight, I am 100 percent sure that a prime Hops would have had his number. He would have tied GGG up often and stayed in the pocket much more than Jacobs. He could win that fight in a phone booth. Plus Hops had the chin to take whatever GGG threw.

          • mike

            If you’ve watched GGG, he doesn’t allow himself to be tied up. I think GGG is slipping past his prime, but both in prime would’ve been great fight.

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          • Philip Matsikoudis

            It’s my belief that only the very top tier of great Middleweight Champions would have been able to defeat Gennady Golovkin. I would include Sugar Ray Robinson, Harry Greb, Mickey Walker, Carlos Monzon and Stanley Ketchel as being favorites to defeat Triple G. I think that the next tier of Marvin Hagler, Marcel Cerdan, Charley Burley would be pick’em bouts. I think Bernard Hopkins would be the next man up that Golovkin would be a slight favorite to win.

    • Philip Matsikoudis

      I enjoyed your comment. In your opinion, where do you rate Golovkin historically in the Middleweight Division?

    • Philip Matsikoudis

      By the way, the United Kingdom has a company that makes the most realistic text based Computer Boxing Simulation called “TITLE BOUT CHAMPIONSHIP BOXING.” Being a collector of all things Boxing I would think you might want this item as it’s actually an Encyclopedia of Boxing with a game built in. You can setup Boxing Cards in a Multitude of real venues, with actual modern & historical Referees, Boxing Judges, Trainers, Cutmen and of course Boxers. You can stage upcoming real matches as the company regularly updates its ratings based upon what transpires in the sport. You can also stage ‘WHAT-IF’ matches of Boxers from different eras. They have paradigm’s for staging tournaments as well. There is also an aging system as well as a system of advancement from a Boxer’s ability at the beginning of his career all the way to being shop-worn. All of these different aspects of the simulation are optional.The game company works in conjunction with the well-known Boxing Website ‘BOXREC’ and their are chat boards both on the Game Website and BOXREC’s that are associated with the thousands of people around the world who own this Boxing Simulation and in many/some instances participate in tournaments and leagues with other Boxing enthusiasts. I have nothing to do with the company but have owned it for over a dozen years

  • Sidewinder

    Lets imagine the weigh in is on fight night. Fight is at 154 lbs.

    Keith Thurman comes in weighing 154 and at his optimum fighting weight maybe or maybe not, but lets just say he’s well hydrated. His opponent Jermall Charlo a big JMW also came in at 154 but dry as a prune, we all know he boils himself down to make 154.

    So does Charlo have a chance to beat Thurman?

    • Stephen M

      That’s a good question. I won’t attempt to answer it… But under the present system younger guys, and those who can afford top notch nutritionists and conditioning gurus, have a definite advantage over older guys whose bodies can’t do the rehydration any more, and younger guys who can’t afford a big team…

      • Sidewinder

        Agree, having these people in your camp is really a big plus, and there at these 20 pound rehydrators who really makes it even more advantageous.

    • Ignition1

      The fight probably wouldn’t even go ahead. Charlo wouldn’t bother taking the fight if it means he comes into the ring light-headed from sitting in a sauna for hours and hours.

      If there was same day weigh-ins (I mean – literally right before the fight), then he would never fight at JMW.

      Which is not a bad thing at all.

  • Colin Mc Flurry.

    Biggest winner. Jacobs he should have got the decision, and proved all the Naysayers wrong.

    Biggest Loser. GGG the Era of fear has gone forever.

    • Your idiotic comment doesn’t even deserve a reply! Ditto to the two bro’s that like your “message!”

      • Colin Mc Flurry.

        That really hurts my feelings. Who are you again?

    • KUSH

      u dont know boxing

    • KUSH

      u dont know boxing

      • Colin Mc Flurry.

        Boxing knows me.

        • KUSH

          I just asked. Boxing said hell no not with that comment. They don’t kno u mannn

  • FreeWilly

    I don’t think it matters whether fighters should have same day weigh-in
    or a day before. The rule should be that a fighter should enter the ring no
    more than the minimum weight of the next division. E.g. a welterweight
    should not weigh at 154 or above. A division should simple mean that it has a minimum weight and a maximum weigh and no fighter should weigh above the maximum weight. For example welterweight is between 147 and 153.99 pounds. Should a fighter weigh 154 on entering the ring, then they should be disqualified ass that would make them a Junior Middleweight. What is currently happening is just ridiculous, with fighters gaining 10-30 pounds on fight night and even more dangerous for the smaller fighters.

    • Ignition1

      But then, why is the smaller fighter fighting in that weight class? Why not step a weight class down and then he will be the bigger fighter instead?

      It’s not the big guy’s fault that he wanted to work hard and slick down to a lower weight? The little guy can do the same in the lower weight division if they wanted to as well.

    • Ignition1

      But then, why is the smaller fighter fighting in that weight class? Why not step a weight class down and then he will be the bigger fighter instead?

      It’s not the big guy’s fault that he wanted to work hard and slick down to a lower weight? The little guy can do the same in the lower weight division if they wanted to as well.

  • Ignition1

    From the fight I saw, size and weight didn’t come into it. Jacobs is a solid boxer with great technique.

    GGG did well to get the win – I wouldn’t call it lucky for him because he also put in work and won rounds so it was legitimate and justifiable that it went his way…but he was lucky that the judges were completely impartial on this one, as it could’ve easily gone to Jacobs if one of the judges felt a bit differently.

  • Teddy Reynoso

    Triple G can beat everyone in and around the middleweight and set an unprecedented record of successful title defenses as world champion and even retire undefeated but it will put him close in terms of greatness to his illustrious predecessors as Sugar Robinson, Carlos Monzon, Marvin Hagler and Bernard Hopkins. It is for the lack of real competition which is a sad commentary on the quality of fighters in and around the middleweight since the likes of Mike McCallum, James Toney, Roy Jones Jr., and Hopkins left the scene. He really needs to beat a name fighter as Canelo Alvarez to at least be mentioned in the same breath as Hopkins as a highly successful middleweight champion who barely made it to the pantheon of the all time greats.

    • Fist_ti_cuffs

      Canelo would be a start, but he’s gonna need to do more than beat him. After all Canelo got walked down by a small WW and soundly beaten. baby g will need to venture north to prove greatness.

      • Mauro Hermida

        You really think Canelo got walked down by Mayweather? You realize Mayweather fought like he normally does, on the back foot, especially after Canelo decided to come forward(too little, too late).

        • Fist_ti_cuffs

          Clearly you didn’t see the fight. You probably also agree with the judge that scored the fight for ginger.

          • booyahcah29

            You assume much fanboy. Canelo made an error by trying to outbox him. I thought he won a round or two. To act like floyd was cutting off the ring and going after him is bullshit. I will also add this. Floyd would struggle mightily with this version and ggg would kill floyd, so to say ggg needs to do more than what floyd did, against a peak not green middleweight canelo is more bullshit to put on your shelf of bullshit.

          • Fist_ti_cuffs

            Wow fangirl, you just said baby g would kill a WW. Well I would hope so for the greatest MW of all time. Let’s be real, Canelo was soundly beaten and yes walked down by the much smaller TBE. Get over it or should I say get out of your feelings lil girl. baby g needs to venture north to 168/175 to prove his supposed greatness and ginger has Chavez Jr problems. -_-

  • JC superstar

    I think GGG won the figth close but clear, and those saying that GGG can’t beat a super midleweigth he just beat a good cruiserweigth so if he faces a heavy canelo it won’t be a problem

    • Fist_ti_cuffs

      Well since he beat a cruiser, I guess it’s time to start calling out SOG. That fight would prove something.

      • Mauro Hermida

        Ward needs to fight Krusher first. That was one shitty decision.

        • Fist_ti_cuffs

          Get out of your feelings. That boogieman has been dispatched.

        • Fist_ti_cuffs

          When the $$$ is right it’s gonna happen. He’s never run from a challenge and won’t start now, but in the meanwhile and the NEW P4P Champ………S……O….G!!!!!!!!!

  • Don Badowski

    Michael, about the rehydration. You say it’s dangerous both ways, day before or day of. First, the whole Day Before thing came about not because of danger to the fighters, but because they would be allowed time to lose the weight if they missed it at a first weigh-in. Promoters did not want to risk fights being cancelled because of it. That’s what I’ve always heard. Maybe you heard different? Please let me know.
    As to a solution? It doesn’t really need one. Weight classes are supposed to make the contests fair. If one fighter can gain 8 pounds and the other 20, how in the world is that fair? You put it back to same day weight-in, the fighters themselves will have to take better care in making weight. Sure, some fights will get cancelled. Bad for the promoters in the short run. Good for the boxers in the long run.
    I can’t believe you are actually in favor of Mayweather / McGregor. How are we supposed to promote boxing, if the biggest thing on is a boxer fighting an MMA? Since you’re old (like me), I’ll ask you a history question…
    How much did Muhammad Ali vs. Antonio Inoki do for boxing? Did Sugar Ray Leonard benefit, or Roberto Duran?

    • mark elding

      Completely my view on the weight issue.
      It needs to get sorted, and I don’t understand why more people don’t take exception with the current rules which make a mockery of fair competition.

  • Robert Archambault

    Jacobs in no way should be looked at as a biggest loser on the night. He came out of that fight a winner by being the first man to ever take GGG a 12 round distance. He deserves nothing but kudos for his performance on the night. I would be happy to see a rematch but not at 160, I would like to see it at 168 where Jacobs rightfully belongs once Golovkin has achieved his goals as a MW.

  • Daniel Kirsner

    Michael–I would prefer to see same day weigh-ins brought back, but what is most important is to ensure an even playing field between fighters. An IBF 2nd day weigh-in without “teeth” for both parties–one which David Lemieux and Daniel Jacobs could skip and still go on to fight (at well over 180lbs in both cases)–is absolutely idiotic. GGG has never seriously lifted weights–for some insane reason this is a point of pride for Abel Sanchez–if he were not bound by the IBF rules he could easily gain 10-15 lbs of muscle, still manage to dehydrate himself down to 160, and enter the ring in the 180s. If I were Tom Loeffler I would make damn sure that in any GGG-Canelo contract either the 2nd day weigh-in is waived, allowing GGG to bulk-up to Canelo Size, OR if either fighter fails to make 170 at the IBF 2nd day weigh-in they either lose many millions of dollars or forfeit the fight entirely.

  • Emeka Nnaji Jr.

    Please don’t allow this b.s. fight between Conor and Mayweather Jr. Also still don’t get the hype for an Alvarez vs GGG bout. Alvarez has proven to be a great fighter at 154 and slightly above, but has shown nothing against a real middleweight. What just saw what happened to Gonzalez when he moved up. He’s struggled in his last two bouts, the same may end up being true for Alvarez.

  • Emeka Nnaji Jr.

    People need to realize that just because Jacob’s and to an extended Brook was able to do that to GGG does not mean Alvarez will be able to. Alvarez has many of the intangibles those two have that gave Golovkin trouble but is missing these that were very important to their success. Lateral movement and stamina. You never know have the luxury of not needing to shave off a couple of extra pounds may help with those deficiencies.

    • FreeWilly

      I agree with almost all you said but just one. Not losing extra pounds won’t help Canelo with lateral movement at all. Actually, nothing would. The boy is built like a Rhino, not a Cheetah :).

  • JV316

    biggest winner III: chris “iron chef” algieri?

  • WillieSmalls

    On the issue of weight advantages, HBO 2 days featuring Terrence Crawford is a great watch. If you’re in the UK there is a worrying documentary about weight cutting by MMA fighters on the BBC. A fighter loses 7kg in 19 hours, then rehydrates 9kg overnight.

  • ceylon mooney

    i like rosenthala take on golovkin-jacobs. after the gonzales robbery, and with the golovkin foght bein damn close, i had no idea what decision would come
    down. i wasnt paying attention to score round by round (i rarely do), but as a whole it coulda been a draw.

    i definitely expected more from golovkin. he didnt have a good answer for what jacobs brought to the fight. that was a big surprise.

    i hope these two get back in the ring after saunders.

    fuck alvarez.

  • ceylon mooney

    i like rosenthala take on golovkin-jacobs. after the gonzales robbery, and with the golovkin foght bein damn close, i had no idea what decision would come
    down. i wasnt paying attention to score round by round (i rarely do), but as a whole it coulda been a draw.

    i definitely expected more from golovkin. he didnt have a good answer for what jacobs brought to the fight. that was a big surprise.

    i hope these two get back in the ring after saunders.

    fuck alvarez.

  • Martin Hall

    “There is no easy answer but I lean toward the current system. I think day-before weigh-ins serve their purpose: Fighters who deprive themselves of liquid to make weight – which has always been a part of boxing – are less vulnerable on fight night because they have time to fully re-hydrate.”

    Well there’s a flipside to the current system which i think a lot of people on these boards have been pointing out. If the current system wasn’t a thing you wouldn’t have guys boiling themselves down to lower weights to fight naturally smaller guys in the first place. What you would hopefully have is men that are within a reasonable range of the weight class they are fighting in, fighting men of similar weight without having to kill themselves to boil down to (insert weight here).

    I’m pretty tired of watching guys make weight, to then balloon up to whatever they goddamn please on fight night.

    • FreeWilly

      And the rehydration clause should be that you can not way beyond the maximun weight/range of your division upon entering the ring on fight night. Simples.

  • Philip Matsikoudis

    I watched this contest and I believe that Gennady Golovkin had to be knocked down for Jacobs to pull out a draw. While I expected Jacobs to be a tougher opponent than Saul Alvarez would be I think people were effected by just how big Jacobs was in comparison to Triple G. Golovkin will have a much easier time with the much smaller Canelo Alvarez . One thing that Danny Jacobs accomplished by simply appearing in the ring like a Heavyweight to Golovkin’s natural Middleweight size is that Canelo Alvarez will never step into the squared circle with him. I think it’s a 60/40 Alvarez never takes on Golovkin unless he deems him so shopworn, like Mayweather did with Pacquiao, that he actually believes he can beat him, which he astutely realizes is not something which can do at the present time. On a more serious note this match crystallized the long overdue need to rescind the Weigh-In Rules back to the day of the Boxing match. It’s absurdly ludicrous how easily pugilists easily manipulate the rules in just about every single fight. This easily manipulated violation of the actual weight limits frequently leads to an overt a wild discrepancy in size, e.g., just like in the Golovkin-Jacobs match where Jacobs probably outweighed Golovkin by 30 lbs. In the Pre-Cruiserweight era this would have definitely been a match between a Heavyweight and a Middleweight. Of course nothing will ever change until a tragedy occurs when it’s so obvious that this rule needs to change forthwith. If it does what division will Julio Caesar Chavez Jr. ever compete in as he always exceeds the weight limit by at minimum two divisions and usually more. He might go winless in any major bouts as it’s his size advantage is basically the only reason he ever wins. Watching this fight it made me wonder just how hard of a puncher Stanley Ketchel must have been to be able to knockdown the great Jack Johnson, arguably the greatest Heavyweight in history.

  • Philip Matsikoudis

    A bout between Conor McGregor and Floyd Mayweather is nothing but a stupid Circus side-show spectacle with the winner being Money being a foregone conclusion unless the luckiest of punches lands. I would much rather see a rematch between Mayweather and a healthy Manny Pacquiao. Let’s face it, Conor McGregor couldn’t beat any current top ten Welterweight and he would even be the betting underdog in a Boxing match against Paulie Malignaggi.

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