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Dougie’s Monday mailbag (Ryota Murata, Higa-Rosales, Hagler-Hearns)

A mailbag first-timer who lives in Japan isn't impressed with Ryota Murata, but the Japanese middleweight star's co-promoter Bob Arum has big plans for the 2012 Olympic gold medalist. Photo / Naoki Fukuda




16
Apr

MURATA AND HIGA

Hi Doug,

I’m a long-time reader, first-time writer. I enjoy the bags. Hope you keep them coming until you’re senile and no longer able. I live in Japan and was finally able to catch a live broadcast featuring two Japanese titlists (and I use the term titlist lightly, particularly in Ryota Murata’s case).

The local broadcasts kind of piss me off because the commentators focus so exclusively on the local fighter that they don’t always mention what the opponent is doing well. During Cristofer Rosales’ filleting of Daigo Higa, they had to scour the replay footage to find a notable blow landed by Higa. Naturally I began to cheer for Rosales. The man peppered his foe with crisp jabs and slashing combinations. He carved Daigo up like a tough cube steak. The blows provoked the opposite of cheers. The crowd burst out in sympathetic “ohs” and “ooos.” Although the corner stopped the fight a bit early, Daigo wasn’t going to win that fight. It takes a lot of guts to come to another guy’s home town, carve him up and take his belt. I hope Rosales shoots up in the ranking from this performance.

The marque fight, if it could be called that, featured one of the least inspiring fights I’ve seen in some time. Let’s be honest about WBA titlist Ryota Murata; he ain’t much to look at. Calling him a meat-and-potatoes guy is generous. He marches forward behind ear muffs and occasionally throws a one-two. He grinned after each round which baffled me given the poverty of his punch output. His opponent, the embarrassing Emanuele Blandmamura, seemed to be allergic to punches and move in reverse so swiftly his back had skid marks from the ropes! Murata was so poor with judging distance his guard touched the timid Italian’s without a blow thrown. The knockout punch that mercifully ended the bout seemed like the only notable punch thrown in the bout. Blandman politely obliged the crowd by staying down.

I was watching some vintage B-Hop the other day and was thinking how that guy would have blasted Murata out by mid-fight. What do you think if Murata were to fight GGG, Alvarez or Saunders?

Mythical Match Ups:

Hopkins-Murata

Hopkins-GGG

Hopkins-Alvarez

Keep up the good work! Cheers! – Mike in Japan

Hey Mike! Thanks for reading the mailbag column for as long as you have and thanks for finally sharing your thoughts with us.

I think the peak middleweight version of B-Hop (1999-2003) would stop Murata by the late rounds (8-10) and clearly outpoint both Golovkin and Canelo in competitive fights.

Murata cracks Hassan Ndam with a right to the body. Photo / Naoki Fukuda

I agree that Murata is a methodical stalker with a very stiff upper body and low punch output, but I also view him as a legit top-10 contender. His jab is one-dimensional but he’s got a good right cross, a damaging body attack and decent punch-blocking ability. If he could just learn to work his jab more (and learn some variation with the left stick), move his head, and increase his punch volume (maybe throw a three-punch combo every now and then), I think he could become more of a threat to his fellow contenders because he is strong and durable.

However, he is far from elite, so I believe that Golovkin, Alvarez and Billy Joe would outclass him. I believe that Daniel Jacobs would also soundly defeat the 2012 Olympic champ.

Having said that, I think Murata can make for good 160-pound scraps against the fellow come-forward scrappers, such as Chris Eubank Jr. (if Junior every drops back down to middleweight), Sergiy Derevyanchenko, David Lemieux and Gary “Spike” O’Sullivan.

I enjoy the bags. Hope you keep them coming until you’re senile and no longer able. The senility has already begun to set in, but don’t worry, I think mental fuzz actually helps me write the column. I’m gonna try to keep going ‘till at least 2021!

The local broadcasts kind of piss me off because the commentators focus so exclusively on the local fighter that they don’t always mention what the opponent is doing well. I don’t understand Japanese but it’s always sounded like the commentators there busted out the pom poms for the home-grown talent… still, I can’t help but love the excitement and enthusiasm in their voices when the Japanese fighter is kicking ass.

During Cristofer Rosales’ filleting of Daigo Higa, they had to scour the replay footage to find a notable blow landed by Higa. I noticed that. To Higa’s credit, despite being wasted from his weight struggles, he managed to land a few hard shots in each round. To Rosales’ credit, he still dominated every round.

Naturally I began to cheer for Rosales. The 23-year-old Nicaraguan is easy to root for. He faced Kal Yafai in Sheffield, England; and Andrew Selby in Wales. Rosales was brought into Yokohama to get slaughtered by Japan’s young KO King, but he’s the one who did the slaying.

The man peppered his foe with crisp jabs and slashing combinations. He carved Daigo up like a tough cube steak. I was impressed with Rosales’ effectively aggressive boxing. His jab was busy and educated and his inside combinations quickly wore down Higa, who is known for his vicious body attack.

Higa is consoled by his manager, Yoko Gushiken, following the first loss of his pro career.

The blows provoked the opposite of cheers. The crowd burst out in sympathetic “ohs” and “ooos.” That’s not surprising. Higa is behind only Murata and Nayoa Inoue in terms of popularity. He wasn’t a huge amateur star, but he still advanced quickly in the pro ranks under the guidance of Japanese boxing legend Yoko Gushiken. Higa has a fan-friendly style and he seems affable and approachable outside of the ring (I met him in Inglewood prior to the “SuperFly 2” card).

Although the corner stopped the fight a bit early, Daigo wasn’t going to win that fight. If Higa wasn’t going to win that fight (and I agree that he wasn’t) and he was getting “carved up like a tough cube steak” (your words), then I don’t think his corner stopped the fight a bit early. I think they saved their fighter from being ruined. And good for them. Higa is only 22. He can bounce back from this setback.

It takes a lot of guts to come to another guy’s home town, carve him up and take his belt. Yes, indeed, it’s takes the heart of a champion.

I hope Rosales shoots up in the ranking from this performance. He will.

 

HIGA-ROSALES

Did you see the Higa-Rosales scrap? Yet another one to throw in FOTY contention. It wouldn’t be my choice because it was a corner stoppage rather than the sadistic KO that many fight fans such as myself tend to associate with a FOTY, but great action nonetheless. I felt I was watching Izzy Vazquez-Rafael Marquez all over again. Wow!

Rosales is worth keeping an eye on, as his most recent setbacks were to a very good Andrew Selby (2017) and current champ Khalid Yafai (2015). Speaking of Higa. I actually felt for him when he didn’t make weight. He looked remorseful and embarrassed, two things I didn’t “see” from Luis Nery. Compounding that shame was facing a very good, hungry opponent who was taller with a longer reach and some nasty leverage on his left hooks.

How about your pick on Jarrett Hurd-Murata? Not often do you see two middleweights go shoulder-to-shoulder, but I can’t see that one not ending up in a phone booth.

Enjoy your work and very much look forward to Mondays and Fridays. – D in Bama

Thanks for the kind words, D.

Who would I pick if Hurd and Murata were to fight? I think their styles and mentalities point to a brutal battle of attrition, thus I have to give at least a slight edge to the naturally bigger man, which is Murata. I think he’s strong enough to prevent Hurd from coming forward. However, despite lacking Murata’s elite amateur background, Hurd is more crafty on the inside. Even if Murata bulls him to the ropes (as he tries to do with every opponent), I think Hurd would box and fight well off of them. I can see Hurd outworking Murata over the distance, but something tells me that he might not be able to shrug off Murata’s big shots as he did with the flush power punches from Austin Trout and Erislandy Lara.

Rosales dominated most of the infighting against Higa. Photo / Naoki fukuda

Rosales is definitely worth keeping an eye on. The Nicaraguan is a welcome addition to the 112-pound division. (Just as Higa will be welcome to the 115-pound division.) With Donnie Nietes recently abdicating his IBF flyweight title to campaign at junior bantamweight (and Higa expected to join the Filipino veteran in the super flyweight ranks), the 112-pound division is in need of new blood. Rosales fits the bill. He’s young (23), but experienced (30 pro bouts under his belt) and battle tested. He could rematch with Selby at flyweight before jumping to 115 pounds for rematches with Yafai and Higa. Beyond return bouts, there are unification fights vs. Artem Dalakian (WBA) and Sho Kimura (WBO). And I’m sure Japanese phenom Kosei Tanaka will earn a major belt soon (probably Kimura’s WBO strap) and a showdown with him would be a major event in Japan.

I thought Higa-Rosales was a good fight, but it didn’t come close to replicating the action of the Vazquez-Marquez trilogy. (It kind of reminded me of the Cristian Mijares-Katsushige Kawashima rematch.)

I was impressed with Rosales’ controlled but active aggression, and I admired the spirit that Higa fought with despite being physically out of the fight. However, it was too one-sided for me to consider it a Fight of the Year candidate. Higa’s will made it interesting but he didn’t do enough earn rounds against Rosales in my view.

The Okinawan was simply unable to fight with his usual relentless intensity and commitment to offense. Higa usually swarms his opponents, but against Rosales he was moving in and out without putting punches together. Once he started backpedaling by Round 4, it was clear that he wasn’t himself.

I hope he gets his weight issues under control and moves up in weight if need be. At 22, with only 16 bouts under his belt (without a distance fight), he’s still a work in progress. I think he can still have a bright future.

 

THE EIGHT-MINUTE WAR

Hi Dougie,

Quick question for a bit of wisdom. It’s the 33rd anniversary this week of my favourite fight, the Marvin Hagler v Thomas Hearns battle in which Hagler earned a 3rd-round stoppage of their MW title fight. Anyone who has seen the fight usually comments on the ferocity of the battle whilst it lasted. Out of curiosity, how would you have scored the 1st two rounds? For the love of me, the action see-saws so much that I’m unable to make my mind up if the scorecard would have read 2-0 to one of the fighters or an even 1-1 draw. How would you have seen it? Kind regards. – Raymond, Edinburgh, Scotland

Geez, I don’t know, Raymond. Hagler and Hearns combined to create a divine level of pugilistic violence. That scrap transcended scorecards. In my opinion, it’s beyond “winning” or “losing.” It’s just a breathtaking fight. Trying to score those rounds just doesn’t seem right.

I guess if I had to score the first two rounds, I’d have ‘em split between the two legends – Round 1 to Tommy, Round 2 to Marvelous.

A bloodied Hagler blasts Hearns with a right. Photo: THE RING

Hearns briefly stunned Hagler early in the opening round and he appeared to land more punches (as well as the harder shots). He couldn’t miss with his right hand (which is probably why he broke it). The Hitman also produced a bleeding cut over the bridge of Hagler’s nose with a punch. However, I should note that Hagler, who set the torrid pace of the fight, landed his share of head scramblers and forced Hearns to the ropes in the final minute of the round. He had Tommy staggering back to his corner after the bell.

Hagler was in more control in Round 2 because Hearns sought to gain command by boxing, but his legs weren’t 100% under him. Hagler was the stronger, more consistent fighter as Hearns tried to stick and move and bomb in spots. I think Hagler clearly outworked Hearns in the second stanza.  

 

CANELO’S RING MIDDLEWEIGHT CHAMPION STATUS

Hi Doug,

I hope you along with your family are doing well. Let me start off by saying I like Canelo a lot and he’s definitely box office anytime he fights. Unlike the other Canelo trolls who hate on him, I, just like them, watch anytime he fights an opponent.

But what will happen to his Ring’s champion status if the Nevada Athletic Commission does indeed suspend him for a period of time? Will he get stripped of his status? – Eli, Austin, TX

If the commission suspends Canelo at Wednesday’s hearing in Las Vegas, we have no choice but to strip him of our middleweight title. That’s our policy.

 

 

Email Fischer at [email protected]. Follow him on Twitter at @dougiefischer





  • Tony Nightstick

    Hmmm, I’m not at all sure that Hopkins beats Golovkin.

    • philoe bedoe

      I think the same thing myself, it’s an hard one to pick.
      Hopkins would have the size advantage but he could have been outworked by GGG…………..

      • Teddy Reynoso

        What do you mean outwork? Gennady typically walks down his opponent’s or stalks them and tries to overwhelm them with bristling two fisted assaults from long or short distances. He is not noted for his inside game which the outworking is usually.done that includes a lot of jostling for position to launch and land punches while strongly defending against and or smothering the other guys offense. That’s more of Hopkin’s type of a fight.

        • Steven Stoddard

          Yeah, I think we’re looking at a clear Hatton=Tszyu scenario. It really
          depends on if BHop would try to box from a distance, or the later–
          lead-right/clinch-mode, to neutralize GGG.

          • Mauro Hermida

            Except Hatton was never even close to Hops ability and GGG doesn’t box like Tszyu.

        • Left Hook2

          GGG does an excellent job of controlling distance. That would make it difficult for Hopkins to lunge in, grapple, do some headbutting, punch out of the clinch, and score points. Above 160 I feel Hopkins handles GGG, but I have a hard time believing that the king of the welters/junior middles would be able to handle GGG at his peak.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            You seem to forget that Hopkins would also be in his peak, too. And we will be talking of his peak at 160 where he made his record 20 defenses while winning all the titles in the process. By and large that would be way different from Hopkins the Professor in the higher weights known more for his smarts and borderline tactics. The best middleweight Hopkins was a stronger, more dangerous and athletic one who can box and ramble while showing signs of the highly tactical, cerebral fighter he would become much later.

          • Left Hook2

            No cakewalk for either fighter. If Hopkins has a bad night like he did vs Mercado he is toast. If GGG goes robot mode like he did vs Alvarez and forgets how to throw hooks to the liver, he is probably toast too.

          • Mauro Hermida

            You really need to check out Hops between 96-99. He wasn’t the stink it out fighter he became when he slowed down.

          • Left Hook2

            I watched him evolve from the Executioner to the Sandman…and it wasn’t a positive evolution..

        • philoe bedoe

          Hopkins as struggled when he’s faced a world class fighter with an high workrate.
          He’s also difficult to get in close and grapple like Hopkins likes to do………….

      • Left Hook2

        Agree. GGG’s jab is something that Hopkins would have trouble getting past, and G also rarely lets the opponent grapple him. I think this sets up nicely for a 12 round split decision for…..G.

        • Stephen M

          It would have been an interesting fight. GGG has a terrific jab. Hopkins was great at timing guys and jumping in with a right hand followed by his head and maybe a shot to the body. Tough fight to call. For all of Golovkin’s experience, I’m not sure that he has anything to prepare him for Hopkins.

          • Koninbeor

            The only thing I ever saw that truly troubled prime Hopkins was RJJ’s blinding speed and otherworldly athleticism, neither of which GGG has. I think B-Hop wins by a ridiculously boring UD in which he neutralizes GGG’s offense and throws just enough punches to win rounds.

            Edit: This was also my prediction for Hopkins/Kovalev, though that was far from a prime Hopkins.

          • Left Hook2

            That is the most likely result. Conversely, Hopkins never fought anyone like G. Those with high pedigree (Jones excluded) were smaller fighters moving up. Everyone likes to point to Tito, but he was a great welter, not a great middle (a win over Joppy is his claim to MW fame..) Nobody had a jab comparable to G. It would be an interesting fight on paper, and the best result would probably look like G-Jacobs, with the worst result being Hopkins-Taylor.

          • Koninbeor

            While I do agree that Hopkins’ biggest wins were against opponents coming in weight, Hagler’s most legendary fights were against men who were also coming up in weight. Granted, the men who came up to face Hagler were head and shoulders above Tito and company.

          • John Newman

            Correct, but Hagler was brought up hard. And his middleweight titles and defenses were against foes levels above Hopkins’ opposition as well. It’s very telling that Hopkins’ first unification fight was against Keith Holmes.

          • Koninbeor

            I don’t rate Hopkins as highly as Hagler, don’t get me wrong, just pointing out that Hopkins isn’t the only fighter whose biggest fights have been against smaller opponents. Hagler very well may be the greatest Middleweight of all time.

          • John Newman

            I think your point is well taken.

            Hopkins didn’t have many middleweight names (or threats) during his reign, while Golovkin had bigger names (Sturm, Quillin, Martinez, Cotto, Canelo) who clearly ducked and avoided him. To me, that speaks more highly of Golovkin’s competition and dominance than Hopkins (but it doesn’t solve the mythical matchup).

            I agree that neither are much a threat to Marvelous, or to Monzon (although I think Golovkin is a much better mythical matchup with either).

          • Koninbeor

            The only man I’d favor over Hagler and Monzon in a MM would be RJJ. To me, RJJ beats everyone in that weight in his prime. He was just so fast it was ridiculous. That said, the legacy of RJJ isn’t to be mentioned in the same breath as either of those men.

          • John Newman

            That’s hard to argue with (and Hagler definitely could have a problem with speed and timing, just look at what Duran was able to do in the early rounds). It would just depend on whether or not Jones could keep his head and not get into a war. For all the dynamite he had in both hands, Roy loses a war with Marvelous (probably worse than Hearns did).

          • Koninbeor

            Definitely agree with that. Jones doesn’t want any part of going to war. He had a knack for not getting hit, not for absorbing punishment.

          • Dug Fisher

            I agree although, it should be mentioned, if Roy campaigned in those guy’s eras he might never have even fought as a middleweight. I certainly don’t think he could make 160lbs on the morning of the fight and maintain peak performance in the ring for many years anyway.

          • Koninbeor

            Same day weigh-in is a fair and valid point. He probably would have been a Light Heavyweight instead.

          • ceylon mooney

            not a chance. the difference in recovery 30 hours gives you is incredible.

          • philoe bedoe

            Hopkins was a great fighter and he had a great career.
            But I can’t see him coming out on top in many mythical matchups against the greats at 160…………….

          • John Newman

            I agree. It’s especially relevant when you consider that the only great middleweight he faced was Jones Jr.

          • philoe bedoe

            I agree, he seemed to struggle with faster and more athletic boxers and he could be outworked………….

          • Teddy Reynoso

            Canelo actually fought G, remember? But even then who among the fighters you mentioned including Canelo that ducked G can be fairly compared to the ones that Hopkins actually fought as Roy Jones, Jr., Trinidad, De la Hoya, Jermain Taylor, Glen Johnson to make you conclude that G has better competition and dominance? Far out, man!

          • Dug Fisher

            I’m not sure any fighter of the past 40 years was brought up harder than Marvin. His pre title fight opposition was tougher than Hopkins faced as champion.

          • John Newman

            Truth. And his career trajectory was also a big reason that he was the last great fighter to be brought up that way.

          • Dug Fisher

            I’ll correct my last statement. On reflection, I can’t think of a fighter in the past 50 years who had it tougher on his way to winning the title.

          • ceylon mooney

            archie moore

          • Dug Fisher

            That would be much further back. But I love me some Ol’ Mongoose.

          • ceylon mooney

            ah yea man–i conveniently missed “the past 50 years”

          • Left Hook2

            To be fair, Hopkins did beat up his smaller opponents (entertaining, executioner style). . Perhaps I dwell too much on the end of Hopkins career with the headbutting and mauling rather than when he was a young exciting fighter on USA Network. And it would be interesting to do mythical matchups between those he defended against and GGG’s defenses. G’s ceiling is probably higher (Jacobs), but the majority would probably favor Hops.

          • Koninbeor

            Yes, you’re right about that. I suppose he became more and more of a safety fighter through the years.

          • Left Hook2

            Several things happen to most fighters that we like to see as people but don’t enjoy in the ring. They age and mature. Instead of the raw, young, I am the baddest man on the planet attitude they mature into a ‘this is a job’ mentality. They see the good and the bad in what they do and have to do. Life has happened to them. Sometimes they become more devout in their religion. Instead of an angry young man taking what is theirs, they become wizened kings, content to rule rather than conquer. Compassion in the ring. I hate on Ward quite a bit, but I don’t doubt that softened some of his blows against lesser men such as Smith and Brand. Pac lost some of his fire. I remember Angel Manfredy going from El Diablo to Angel..and he seemed to be a lesser fighter. In the end I can’t blame them..but the Diablo in me sure likes to see some a$$ get kicked too..

          • John Newman

            He could still stink up a fight against any legitimate threat to knock him out. Jones Jr consistently said that Hopkins was a boring fighter after their first fight (with very good reason). With RJJ it was speed (and that cracking power), but with Golovkin it could just as easily be the thudding, debilitating power that would lead Hopkins to fight “tactically”.

          • Mauro Hermida

            That talk didn’t stop RJ from running around the ring. RJ moved like a scared man in there, especially when what he landed wasn’t doing much. Trust me, he did not want to fight him in the pocket. He can talk like he doesn’t respect the guy, but he fought like he respected him, and that was a raw Hops at best.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            Jacob, higher ceiling? Perhaps in height but in quality, would you say higher than Jones, Taylor, Johnson, Trinidad? That’s too much of blind admiration and faith for G!

          • Left Hook2

            I said Hopkins WINS, not his losses…He lost to RJJ. Everybody does. Now that is out of the way… Trinidad? Really? His wins at middleweight were over Cherifi and Joppy. No way he beats Danny. Trinidad was a welter…
            Taylor? He LOST to Taylor. Taylor beat Hopkins up to LHW..so again, where is the win? Not there. Johson? That is an intriguing matchup…Johnson at the time of his loss to Hopkins vs Jacobs at the time of his loss to GGG. Who wins that one? I think it is a tossup. 185 lb Jacobs vs 170 lb Johnson… You make the call Teddy. Or you can put it to Doug next mailbag.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            It’s the quality of opposition that we should be talking about, not merely wins that do not necessarily reflect character. Who has Jacob fought and defeated that would convincingly prove he is superior to Johnson or anybody Hopkins had fought and beaten AT 160?

          • Left Hook2

            That, my friend, is the debate. I don’t know if he would beat Johnson or any of the welters/junior middles that Hopkins invited to his party. But I am pretty sure he would be favored over them.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            Trinidad was a welterweight before he moved up to the junior middleweight and later the middleweight. That’s the route taken by Walker, Robinson, Basilio, Griffith, Duran, Hearn, Leonard, later by Martinez, Cotto and Alvarez. That does not make them lesser midfleweights than fighters who started their careers at 160.
            You are merely basing your postulate on Jacob’s size not on his actual worth and capability.

          • Left Hook2

            whoa whoa whoa…. I think it is a worthy debate. That is all. In a MM, does Jacobs beat those guys? I don’t know. He appeared to be talented enough to give them all fits in his bout with GGG. Yes, fighters move up and prove their worth at certain weights. But if you say Trinidad proved to be a great middle by beating Joppy and Cherifi, you are sadly mistaken. He was a great welter. A very good JM. And MW was a task too big..

          • Left Hook2

            BTW..you make good points in your arguments. I certainly appreciate it.

          • Mauro Hermida

            Titos best weight was at 154. An old Hops was robbed against Taylor. I also think by then, he looked like a man struggling to make 160.

          • Mauro Hermida

            I think Hops would have KOd Jacobs. I reference the one that beat Echols.

          • ceylon mooney

            i could see that. shit i think pavlik would KO jacobs.

          • Left Hook2

            Definitely a possibility. Comparing Echols to Jacobs, Jacobs had more amateur experience (137-7 vs 54-7), and Echols life, as documented below, was a mess. Jacobs has shown much more discipline outside the ring. Not saying DJ beats Hopkins, but I think he would definitely be favored over Echols.

            http://qctimes.com/sports/antwun-echols-timeline/article_4ed5053e-7bd9-11e2-bd18-001a4bcf887a.html

          • Teddy Reynoso

            I would dare say that the little Trinidad you are talking about would have given G all the troubles he could handle. Nobody has a jab comparable with G? Sure, because he misses most of them and only connect because he always stick them out in defense.

          • Left Hook2

            Teddy..I didn’t say GGG’s jab was the greatest anybody ever had. I said it was probably better than any jab Hopkins ever faced. You think GGG has a weak jab? He controlled Lemeiux with it. He made Jacobs look like a bobble head with it. He got TOO enamored with it vs Alvarez, because he could hardly miss. Is that stick better than Squirrel? Lipsey? James? Brown? Jackson? DLH? Tito? I dare say yes, even the last two, because of his natural size. It would take more than a one-trick pony to beat Hopkins, but at least G has the building block.

          • Stephen M

            No doubt that RJJ was the better man but Hopkins made RJJ look human which in itself was no small feat.

          • Koninbeor

            He looked human with a broken right hand. When you beat the second best man in the division with one hand, that’s pretty impressive.

          • Stephen M

            That’s the first time I heard of that. On Wikipedia they say “Jones claimed he had entered the bout with a broken right hand”. There isn’t a lot of info about that…
            I also read that ” While working for HBO as an analyst for Bernard Hopkins’ title defense against Simon Brown, Jones would admit on air that he was 16 pounds heavier than Hopkins on fight night, weighing 180 to Hopkins 163″. I wonder if that is true.

          • Koninbeor

            I’d never heard anything contrary to Jones having a broken right hand. It’s very consistent with the way he fought. But as for him weighing much more than Hopkins on fight night, I don’t doubt it. As someone pointed out earlier in regards to MMs with Hagler and Monzon, Jones probably never would have been in their division in the era of same day weigh-ins.

          • Mauro Hermida

            I think that is an excuse. Floyd would do the same thing any time he struggled. The hurt hand nonsense. I watched Martinez(using a middle for reference) KO dudes when he had hurt his hand. The name escapes me currently, but he KOd a brit(who later won a title) with a hurt hand and hurt elbow if I am not mistaken. He had broken his hands more than once(I can think most recently of Chavez). He never used it as an excuse though and tried to knock guys out. RJ would have always had trouble with Nard. As skilled as RJ was, I don’t believe him to be super tough and the fact that later in his career he picked his share of taxi cab drivers further proves my point.

          • Mauro Hermida

            Hops had an excellent jab. Ask Tito. I don’t know if GGG was better in that department.

          • Stephen M

            I’m sure that Hopkins would make Golovkin very tentative on the jab.

        • philoe bedoe

          Spot on…………..

      • DRE

        If they fought at above 160 then definitely Hopkins. But 160 that is a tough one to call. I can see Hopkins frustrating and roughing up GGG up close and winning a close but ugly fight but at mid range GGGs jab and workrate could be a nightmare for Hopkins. If they both are able to take turns imposing their styles on each other then we a get a real grueling physical fight that could be just as grueling to score no matter who the 3 judges are.

        • philoe bedoe

          I agree…………..

      • Mauro Hermida

        Hops was bigger, but he walked around at 165.

    • ceylon mooney

      i think the peak hopkins beats golovkin now. i look at jacobs post-knockdown performance and golovkins inaction thenfirst 3 rounds against alvarez…yea i gotta agree with hopkins winning.

    • John Newman

      I agree. It’s a really tough fight to call. There are solid arguments that Hopkins’ peak was not at 160, or that his 160 peak was lower than his light heavyweight peak.

      I believe a peak Hopkins at 160 would beat the current Golovkin, but what about the Golovkin that wrecked everyone who entered the ring with him from 2012 to 2015?

      • Dug Fisher

        The best Hopkins I ever saw was probably the one that beat down a young, talented Glen Johnson at 160lbs in ‘97. Fast pace and, crucially, little in the way of infringements (too much really detracts from a fighters’ performance in my view, a la Andre Ward). It would remain Johnson’s only clear loss for quite some time.
        I guess I’d edge that Hopkins over GGG, though it pains me to say it. However, if Golovkin had not been shamefully avoided during his prime years, I’ve little doubt that he might have produced a few performances to change my assessment.

        • John Newman

          Hopkins does look really good (even years later) in the Johnson fight. I just don’t rate Johnson very highly. He never really did anything at middleweight and even his light heavyweight accomplishments (Jones and Tarver) are unimpressive in my eyes.

          • Dug Fisher

            I can see where you’re coming from. I just tend to assess fighters fight by fight and I think Johnson boxed very nicely against Hopkins. He was just shut down and beaten up in every respect.

        • Teddy Reynoso

          Who among the top few who ducked Gennady as Martinez, Cotto, Sturm can we fairly compared to the top guys Hopkins actually fought and mostly beat in his middleweight reign as Jones Jr., Trinidad, De la Hoya, Johnson and Taylor?

      • D. Gambino

        For me, I would have to slightly favor Hopkins over Golovkin. I don’t know what Golovkin would do to counter all of Hopkins’ “tactics” in the ring. Hopkins knew how to “ugly up” a fight and you can be sure that he would do this against Golovkin. Conversely, would Hopkins be able to handle the power and pressure of Golovkin for 12 rounds.

        I think it would also depend on who was ref’ing the fight as well. If we have Smoger in there – then I’d have to go with Hopkins as Smoger would allow more of the inside stuff. Bayless would keep the fight at a distance which would push the edge to Golovkin somewhat.

        • Dug Fisher

          Yeah, good points.

        • John Newman

          I would slightly favor Hopkins as well. But I could still see the fight going very similar to Golovkin’s destruction of Maclin (with Hopkins obviously being tougher and better).

          Hopkins would have wanted the fight in the pocket, or at least close enough that Golovkin couldn’t win with his jab (which is better than B-Hop’s). For three years the only middleweights in history I would have said survived that kind of a war with Golovkin are Monzon and Hagler. Everyone else gets too busted up.

          So we’re left with how much grappling, headbutting, and “tactics” the ref lets Hopkins get away with. As you said. . .

          • DRE

            Not just Hagler and Zale. Don’t forget Gary Lockett who was an WBO champ or IBO champ whatever. Oh never mind. How about a GGG vs Harry Greb or a prime Tony Zale.

          • John Newman

            I wish we had more footage of Zale to go off. Graziano saying that he thought Zale would have beaten the GOAT is enough for me to take Zale over almost any middleweight since (although with how quickly Sugar Ray KO’d Rocky, it’s hard to take it as a given).

            As for Harry Greb, I’ve read credible arguments from writers who were alive to see both, that he was at or near the level of Robinson (Bert Sugar himself had him number 2, I believe). That’s enough for me.

            I’d take Greb or Zale over any modern middleweight (Hagler and Monzon included), but I do it while admitting my own ignorance of their level of greatness.

            I’d take Golovkin and Hopkins over Lockett, and Golovkin over Briscoe.(and calling that a war is an understatement). Briscoe – Hopkins would have been bloody and rough (and also perhaps hard to watch).

          • ceylon mooney

            seems zale was the only guy NOT named charlie burley robinson didnt fight. how they miss each other? robinson was fighting at 160 at the same time rocky and zale were fighting each other.

          • John Newman

            I’m willing to bet it wasn’t a duck on either man’s part.

          • ceylon mooney

            yeah, i wouldnt make that bet neither, but i would like to know why it never happened. he was a frequent visitor to 160 years before he was champ. hell he fought la motta twice (i think) and a buncha other guys at 160 before winning the 147 crown. my god what a frickin beast. jesus imagine mayweather fighting golovkin and jacobs twice at 160 as a welterweight contender before takin the crown at 147 from margarito. holy crap.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            Everyone else in middleweight history except Monzon and Hagler get busted up by GGG? Including Robinson, Walker who fought and beat even heavyweights? Hopkins who took all the best shots from Kovalev at 175? Are you crazy or something?

          • Mauro Hermida

            Some of these guys are really overrating GGG. I know he is slowing down, but the guy had absolutely struggled with good fighters in Jacobs and Canelo. Notice I said good, they are nowhere near great.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            The trouble is that they are overrating him on the basis of fights he never had because they claim he was largely avoided including by such fighters as Martinez, Cotto even Ward. And underrating such champions as Monzon, Hagler and Hopkins who all fought the fights that made and established them.

          • D. Gambino

            Golovkin struggled with Jacobs and Alvarez who both entered the ring on fight night as, basically, light heavyweights. Golovkin still had enough to put Jacobs on the mat AND he CLEARLY beat Alvarez.

            Jacobs and Alvarez would’ve been tough outs for any fighter, in any generation, on the nights that Golovkin beat them. I’m not saying that Golovkin is an ATG but he will be in the hall of fame.

          • DRE

            Oh come on Teddy. If guys like Macklin and Rosado were no match for GGG what chance would Mickey Walker or Ray Robinson have?

          • Teddy Reynoso

            Yeah and include all those top fighters he never get to fight because they “ducked him” or will never fight because they emerged ahead of him.

          • John Newman

            Keep picking those nits, Teddy. Re-read the post, and pay close attention to the word modern.

            Also, did Hopkins take all of Kovalev’s best shots? Or just two in the first round before he ran with his left held out front for defense over the last eleven?

            I saw Kovalev floor Hopkins in the first and then buzz him again before the bell, then watched B-Hop recuperate while he tried to survive by running away with his left held out in front of him.

            Not the best argument, even by your standards.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            Modern boxing history covers the Robinson era FYI.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            Are you comparing Hopkins with the willing but foolish human punching bags as Mackin and Rosado that GGG whaled away at will and his pleasure? You must be kidding me.

        • Mauro Hermida

          GGG would not dent him, no way in hell. Taking over 200 shots from a harder hitter in Kovalev, at 50 no less, told me all I need to know about hard Nard. GGG is tough, but Hops is tougher.

          • D. Gambino

            No doubt in mind that this would likely be a split decision win. No matter who wins it. Hell I wouldn’t be surprised if it were a draw.

    • Colin Mc Flurry.

      Can definitely envision B-hop feigning injury and looking for a way out.

      • Mauro Hermida

        I see the 35 year old Hopkins putting it on a prime GGG. GGG too slow and not hard to hit. Now if the 96-99 version of Hops fought this version of GGG, he turns his face to shit.

        • D. Gambino

          You know damn well that Hopkins would turn a Golovkin fight into a clinch-fest due to Golovkin’s constant pressure. I’m not saying that Hopkins won’t land nice punches but it would be a trademark Hopkins ugly fight.

  • Charlie U.

    Finally!! Canelo will be stripped of the Ring Middleweight title on Wednesday, ostensibly by the N.S.A.C. It’s been a long time coming. Unlike others, I never really had a problem with Canelo. I didn’t like him giving up his belt to avoid GGG, and the fact that he’s been catered to by the powers that be in the industry (including our beloved Ring magazine). But he always (eventually) took on the toughest challenges and he was always a competitor. At the risk of sounding like Monsieur Archambault, now I say…. f**k him! I think he’s a dirty cheat and I think most boxing insiders agree. The burden of proof is on him, but two negative tests and the good ole eyeball test indicate to me that he knew exactly what he was doing.

    • Jody Hanna

      Agreed.

    • Colin Mc Flurry.

      Werd!

    • Stephen M

      You might be surprised that I am on the fence on this. I hope that the hearing is fair and based on facts.

      • Koninbeor

        I think he should have been stripped of his RING belt when he dumped the WBC title but I’m with you on this. I’m not ready to call Canelo a cheat. I truly hope that the whole thing was an act of negligence rather than a willful act. Canelo has been good for boxing overall and I never hope for a worst case scenario with anyone. I’d like to think he’s a bigger and better man than that.

        • Stephen M

          The Ring belt thing is a good example of the tendency of any institution to put the rules ahead of what the rules were put in place for. The rules that were supposed to keep the belt meaningful have rendered it meaningless. And,as the ship sinks, the captain continuously repeats “but we are following the rules”…

          • Dug Fisher

            Ouch.

            Very well said though.

          • Well said, but untrue, Fake Dug.

          • Dug Fisher

            Hey, you’re the real Doug, I’m the real Dug.

          • Koninbeor

            I agree. Cotto should have been stripped of the belt before fighting Canelo so the title never should have been on the line to begin with. That was bad enough but letting Canelo hold onto the title after dumping the WBC belt because he wasn’t ready to be a champion is even worse to me.

          • Robert Archambault

            Cotto WAS stripped of his WBC title before the Canelo fight for refusing to pay the sanctioning fee. WBC decided to keep their title in play for that fight when it should rightly have gone to GGG, the Interim Champion at the time.
            RING never seem to strip their title from anyone. If Jared from Subway held a RING title before his conviction for being a pedophile, he would probably still hold that title in prison today. 🙂

          • Don’t be silly. Andre Ward, Adonis Stevenson, Guillermo Rigondeaux and Tyson Fury were all stripped of their RING titles for either being inactive or for not fighting a top-5 contender in a two-year period.

          • Robert Archambault

            You’re correct. I just feel that TWO YEARS is one year too long. And I think in Ward’s case, it was closer to three years, maybe Stevenson as well.
            But yes, there have been titles stripped in the past.
            At the moment, I am way too sad over the loss of Harry Anderson to worry about something so inconsequential in my life as boxing. I’ve been watching Night Court clips on YouTube since hearing the news.

          • Fist_ti_cuffs

            Kinda like our government.

        • Dug Fisher

          I think the Ring belt should have been vacated when Martinez lost to Cotto at a catchweight and later retired. Yeah, I know above 154lb is middleweight yadda yadda yadda, but the UPPER weight limit HAS to be set at 160lb for the titles to be legitimately on the line, despite what the fighters might agree to and despite ehat they weigh on the scales. Otherwise, we’re just making up more weight divisions.
          GGG- Murray was the first fight since that debacle that was justifiable as being for the vacant middleweight title. In fact, as something of a purist, I consider Golovkin to have made 6 successful defenses of that title. That being said, I only consider Hopkins to have also made 6 defenses of the same (he may have unified all the belts against Tito but that was also the first time he faced a guy with the legitimate claim to being #2 in the division).
          The legit middleweight record is safe with Monzon, in my view.

          • Koninbeor

            The belt transferring from Martinez to Cotto wasn’t a big deal to me because Martinez wasn’t a large Middleweight and that didn’t really give Cotto an advantage. However, fighting every title fight after that at Cottoweight should have been rewarded with Cotto being stripped.

            The reason I say that Canelo should have been stripped when he dumped the WBC strap rather than not inheriting the belt at all is because of the justifications that THE RING made for not stripping Cotto. But regardless of whether or not Canelo should have had the belt to begin with, he certainly shouldn’t have kept it when he told the world that he wasn’t ready to be a champion.

          • John Newman

            I completely agree that the Murray fight (especially when you consider Murray’s tactics after the first round) established Golovkin as the clear best in the division. That the lineal champions avoided him in no way tarnishes what he accomplished or what he was.

          • Dug Fisher

            I re-watched that fight only last week. I had forgotten just how courageous an effort Murray gave, in the face of such a merciless pounding from Golovkin. And that was a guy who clearly beat Sturm and edged Martinez, in my opinion.

          • John Newman

            Murray had never really been threatened before then. He was bothered some by Martinez’ athleticism, but he was big and durable and Golovkin beat him to a pulp and completely changed his career.

          • Pietey Trenton

            I rewatch that fight alot, GGG at his best, his feet where mesmerising that night, his hands accurate and economic (not loading up untill he’d set it up, not a comment on output), sadly I think that was the best well ever see him perform, its been a gradual decline since, the first round (it may not have been the very first) against Jacobs looked like he still had it, for about 30 seconds, he glided to the left, then glided to the right and had Danny pinned to the ropes with foot work alone, then let him off the hook, and folowed him around the ring for the rest of the fight.

          • Hindsight is 20-20, isn’t it, Duggy? Should we go back and rewrite history based on what hardcore fans demand now?

          • ceylon mooney

            history is always bein rewritten & reframed based on the interests of now. thats the very process of writing history.

          • Koninbeor

            Yes. While you’re at it, I’d like to have my cake and eat it, too.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            When Ceferino Garcia defended the middleweight title against Henry Armstrong both were well below 160, weighing 154 ( which was within the middleweight range back then as there was still no junior middleweight class) and 144 ( welterweight), respectively. Where can we find the rule that both fighters have to fight at the maximum limit of 160 for the bout and the championship at stake to be validly for the middleweight division?

          • ceylon mooney

            no one is saying fighters have to weigh in at the limit.

            weight classes are set by limit.
            160 is 160. 155 is not 160, and 155 is not a weight class.
            no catchweight is a weight class–thats what catchweight means.
            you cant be the champ at a weight class by not fighting at that weight class any more than you can win the 100 meter by running no more than 90 meters.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            155 is not a weight class, never been and.never will be. But 155 is middleweight as it is within the floor and ceiling limit of the division.

            Now, if one fighter comes or both fighters agree to fight at a catchweight below but still within the 160 limit, it is still a middleweight fight.

            I have cited the Garcia-Armstrong as example. Garcia the champion weighed just 154 and Armstrong just 144 but their fight was rightfully billed as for the middleweight championship of the world.

            Your comparison with running the dash is not accurate. as boxing is fought within a regulated number of rounds.

            In boxing, you can give or take a few pounds as long as it is within of or e below the weight limit and you are more comfortable and effective fighting at that level. Armstrong again is the classic example. Also Pacquiao.

          • ceylon mooney

            no one on this thread has ever said that fighters must hit the weight limit. ive never seen that on this board anywhere.

            weight classes are set by limit not by nickname.

            because of this, you can fight up weight classes. you gave armstrong as an example. i often use ray robinson, micky walker and many others. i think ray robinson weighted in at 157 or 159 when he fought at 175.

            a fight at 155 is not at 160. because 155 is not 160. no matter what you weigh in at, the weight class is 160.

            a catchweight is not a weight class–thats the definition of a catchweight.

            running is classified by distance as boxing is by weight. yea theres rounds in boxing. theres no knockouts in running. that has nothing to do with the comparison.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            Will somebody help educate this guy about the principle of the boxing weight classes and their ranges that include their floor as well as ceiling limits. This guy has been saying that a fight at 155 is not a middleweight fight. Of course, it is, actually all fights starting from 154.1 up to the max limit of 160. The reason weight ranges are set is to allow for flexibility and preference as well as help the fighters to meet specifically the maximum limit, given that weigh ins in the past were held on the day of the fight. Actually my original post on this matter was a reaction directed to Koninboer, Archumbault and Dug who all contended that Cotto and Canelo ought not to be considered as WBC and Ring middleweight champions because they did not fight at the maximum 160 lbs. That’s why I brought up the case of Garcia and Armstrong to prove that two fighters needed not weight the full limit to rightfully fight for the middleweight championship of the world. But today compliance to the limit is merely a formality as in truth, at fight time fighters weigh much more than the limit of the division they are supposedly fighting at.

          • ceylon mooney

            for the third time, no one ever on this board has said that you have to weigh in at the limit.

            you dont get it.

            a catchweight is not a weight class.

            weight classes are set by limit not nickname.

            a fight at 155 is not at 160 because the 160 weight class goes up to 160.

            160 is 160, no matter what you weigh in at.

            again, no one ever on this board has said that you have to weigh in at the limit or maximum.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            No one? Read back earlier posts of Koninboer, Robert and Dug.
            I never said that catchweight is a weight class. I said 155 is middleweight as it is within the middleweight ranges and limits.
            I agree that the middleweight is set by limits, that is over 154 but not over 160.

            Cotto and Pacquiao agreed to fight at catch weight of 145 and it was for the welterweight or147 lbs title.

          • ceylon mooney

            no one has said a fighter must weigh in at the limit.

            cotto-pacquiao fight was bogus title fight. so was leonard-lalond for the 175 title, which is the next weight class above 168, which is the class they had the fight at. 145 is not a weight class.

            martinez fought and won titles at 160. cotto never fought at 160. alvarez first fight at 160 was golovkin.

            catchweights arent new. i dont have no problem for that. substituting catchweights for weight class is bullshit tho.

            i dont have a boxing idol. many of my favorite fighters have been ring champ.

          • Koninbeor

            Correct. Let’s educate Teddy a bit.

            Is 155 considered Middleweight? Yes, anything above 154 up to and including 160 is Middleweight. However, and the however is an important word here, setting the LIMIT of the weight at 155 instead of the NATURAL LIMIT of 160 makes it a catchweight.

            What is a catchweight? A catchweight is a term used in combat sports, such as boxing or mixed martial arts, to describe a weight limit that does not fall in line with the traditional limits for weight classes. Feel free to look up catchweight on Wikipedia or wherever you like for a more thorough explanation.

            The Middleweight championship is by the very definition the championship of a weight that is limited to a maximum of 160 lbs. The reason that you fight at a catchweight is to keep the bigger fighter from having enough of an advantage. I don’t have a problem with that so long as it isn’t a title fight. If you’re not willing to allow your opponent to weigh in at the Middleweight limit then you don’t deserve to be the Middleweight champion, pure and simple.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            Bobo kayong dalawa. Waste of time.

          • Koninbeor

            You’re right, Teddy, you are a waste of time.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            Magtulong pa kayo pareho naman kayong bobo. You can google that.

          • Koninbeor

            Google is capitalized, FYI.

            Edit: And, for the record, you can’t translate word for word from Tagalog to English and carry over the same meaning. You should know this.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            I don’t think the problem concerns merely semantics but your faulty understanding of the concept of the boxing weight classes. You may call it catch weight but still it falls within the range of specific existing and recognized weight class.

          • Koninbeor

            “A catchweight is a term used in combat sports, such as boxing or mixed martial arts, to describe a weight limit that does not fall in line with the traditional limits for weight classes.”

            “In Professional boxing, the middleweight division is contested above 154 lb (70 kg) and up to 160 lb (73 kg).”

            So you tell me, Teddy, if the traditional limit for the Middleweight maximum is 160, does limiting the upper limit to 155 make the bout a traditional Middleweight bout or a catchweight bout? You’re the one with a faulty concept of weight classes. This is very, very cut and dry and not debatable. You’re wrong. If you were right then catchweights wouldn’t even exist.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            Limited to a maximum of 160 lbs? Where can we read that specific line?

          • Koninbeor

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middleweight

            If that doesn’t do it for you, Google is your friend.

          • Teddy Reynoso

            Okay and here is what it says, in professional boxing, the middleweight is a division contested at weights above 154 but not over 160.
            It does not say limited to 160.

          • Koninbeor

            You do realize that, in the English language, there are many ways to word things and still have the same meaning, right?

          • Teddy Reynoso

            So my simple question is a fight at 155 a middleweight fight or not?

          • Koninbeor

            No, that isn’t your simple question because I already answered that. You’re doing your best attempt at verbal gymnastics to justify something that has already been explained into the ground. Telling your opponent that they can’t weigh in at the upper limit of the division is a catchweight, Teddy. Middleweight is a maximum of 160 lbs. If you limit below 160 but above 154, it’s a catchweight. Yes, you are free to weigh in under the limit if you so choose. The reason the rule is there isn’t so that you HAVE to meet the limit, it’s to make sure neither man has too great of a size advantage.

            Are we done now or are you going to just keep arguing so you can try to find some loophole to make yourself sound right?

          • Teddy Reynoso

            Just simple yes or no will do.

          • Koninbeor

            I already explained multiple times. You’re not getting a simple yes or no.

          • ceylon mooney

            no

          • ceylon mooney

            no. a fight at 155 cannot be middleweight because middleweight is the nickname for 160. a fight at 155 is not at 160. it may be a fight between middleweights, but a fight is at 160 if and only if the weigh in limit is 160.

          • ceylon mooney

            weight classes are set by fixed limit. the weight class is 160. the limit of 160 is always 160 because 160 is 160. a catchweight is not a weight class. you can fight up but not down.

          • ceylon mooney

            yep. weight classes are set by limit and do not change, even when nicknames do. a catchweight is a weigh in limit that is not a weight class.

            you dont have to weigh above 154 to fight at 160. you can weigh in at 151 and fight at 160 if you like because, as you said weight classes are set by fixed limit.

      • nick hapta

        ‘fair and based on facts’
        failed two VADA tests and we all know what the NSAC rule book revision says.
        In no other form of amateur or professional competition would an athlete have
        a valid excuse.

        • Koninbeor

          He can still be suspended for negligence without being branded a cheat, though. Even if he accidentally broke the rules, negligence is still a rules violation.

          • Stop making sense.

          • Pietey Trenton

            Which of course will allow ring to keep canelo as it’s middle weight champ yeah?

          • Fist_ti_cuffs

            The question is will he?

          • Koninbeor

            Will he be suspended? I’d be shocked if he isn’t. I think the NSAC is pretty much backed into a corner at this point. If they were going to let him off without so much as a slap on the wrist, that opportunity has passed.

          • Fist_ti_cuffs

            I sure hope you are right. He should not be allowed to fight again this calendar year.

          • Koninbeor

            I would be surprised if he gets anything other than a six month suspension retroactive to February 17. I’m not an expert, though. Guess we’ll find out tomorrow.

          • Fist_ti_cuffs

            That’s not even a suspension since he only fights in September and May, but I think you’re right.

          • Koninbeor

            It will cause him to miss his May payday but it’s a slap on the wrist at best.

        • Stephen M

          Yeah, I mean that they don’t give him a ridiculously long suspension if Canelo can prove that he ate tainted meat.

          • Koninbeor

            Does he have to prove it or just do enough to make them “believe” him?

          • Robert Archambault

            There is no possible way that Canelo can PROVE without a doubt that he consumed tainted meat. All the invoices in the world prove nothing. Without a sample of the beef or a stool sample from Canelo at the time, it cannot be proven to any proper acceptable standard.

          • Koninbeor

            I agree completely. The grounds for the commission being convinced are undefined.

          • Robert Archambault

            I also learned something new today that has not been written about anywhere on the RING site, or anywhere else, that I have been able to find. On Boxingscene, in Breadman’s column today, he noted that it was GGG and Sanchez who requested to VADA that Canelo be tested 11 weeks out instead of waiting for 8 weeks out from the fight. If regular time frame had been followed, Canelo would have never tested positive.

            That fits well with my and others suspicion that Canelo may have had a set PED regime that gave him enough time to test clean due to the testing schedule starting only 8 weeks before a fight. Something that is very easy to do when you know exactly which dates you will be fighting on, each and every year.
            Very good call by Team GGG!

          • Koninbeor

            I don’t even know how to respond to that, Robert. Thanks for sharing the info.

          • Charlie U.

            Another good call was for them to get a restraining order against you, Stan.

      • Charlie U.

        On the fence about him being stripped or him being a cheater?

        • Koninbeor

          I’m with Stephen, specifically on him being a cheater. He should be stripped. A banned substance was found in his system. Regardless of the reason, there has to be consequences for that. But I really, really hope that it was due to stupidity and not willful cheating.

          • Charlie U.

            I commend your optimism. I was once that way as well. But I can’t be that way with athletes anymore. Too many of the ones I respected and admired let me down; especially here in the U.S. There isn’t one single athlete out there that would surprise me if he/she pissed hot.

        • Stephen M

          Cheater.

          • Charlie U.

            Ok.

          • TMT NYC-DA REAL GHOSTBUSTERS

            Stripper.

          • Koninbeor

            I wondered why he insisted on fighting in Las Vegas…

    • ceylon mooney

      according to the ring criteria, he could have been stripped the moment he tested positive.

      • Koninbeor

        The most unfortunate aspect of this situation to me is that THE RING was supposed to be the standard in an era when the sanctioning bodies are such a joke. If the proper standards would have been kept then this whole talk of whether or not Canelo should be or will be stripped wouldn’t even be a topic of discussion.

        • Stephen M

          In defense of the Ring, it is difficult to set up a system of rules that is foolproof, especially seeing that the Ring cannot enforce anything.

          • Koninbeor

            Agreed, but there has to be a level of integrity to it all for their belt to have any meaning. Adding a simple “championships cannot be transferred in a catchweight” clause would go a long way.

            Edit: I don’t have a problem with catchweights, they should simply be considered non-title defenses. I know this flies in the face of what I said about the title transferring from Martinez to Cotto earlier. I wouldn’t have a problem if the title was simply vacated when Martinez retired. Again, higher standards that the sanctioning bodies.

          • Stephen M

            Good point. And maybe a clause whereby the Champion has to face the consensus #1 contender in a set time frame.

          • Koninbeor

            They do at least come close to that with this rule: The Champion does not schedule a fight with a Top-5 contender from any weight class for two years.

            Making them face the #1 would be a bit difficult since they aren’t a sanctioning body and have no control over what fighters’ promoters do.

          • Stephen M

            I agree. But that means that you could have a long reign as Ring and Lineal champion and never fight the man that everyone recognizes as THE man at the weight.

          • Koninbeor

            One would hope that, eventually, THE RING #1 would be a mandatory for the fighter in that situation at the very least.

          • Stephen M

            If the guy has a belt from a different organization they don’t even show up in the listings.

          • Koninbeor

            That’s true, I didn’t think of that.

          • Robert Archambault

            That’s not true. While organizations do not rank other title holders, they always list them as Champions of the organization whose title they do hold. This indicates that they are champions in their own right and there is no need to give them a ranking.

          • Robert Archambault

            The RING and Lineal titles are two different things. There is no organization that overseas the Lineal title and no real rules governing it. In fact, I believe the lineal title should not be able to be transferred in a catchweight fight and should rightfully be vacant at this time or in the hands of GGG due to his win over Jacobs, at the time a fight between the top two MW in the world as Canelo had yet to fight at 160 at that time.

          • Michael Montero

            You still have mouth attached to GGG’s crotch…

          • nick hapta

            The guy usually makes statements that make a lot of sense.
            You on the other hand are a troll that should be on Boxing Scene…

          • Michael Montero

            Okay interloper.

          • ceylon mooney

            yeah. the 4th estate and all, but, damn, the lines are blurred. the ring is part of the boxing business and its the job of the business to validate itself.

          • Robert Archambault

            I disagree. When it comes to the RING title, they can enforce everything. And as Canelo has already been suspended, even though it is temporary, Canelo should already have been stripped of the title.

          • Robert, I put it up to the Ratings Panel the moment that news of Canelo’s temporary suspension was announced and they voted not to strip him until his hearing, then set for April 10. I posed it again when it was moved to April 18, and the majority still voted not to strip him until the NAC provided it’s official verdict and the parameters of the ruling.

          • Robert Archambault

            I know it’s not your decision alone and would never put that burden on your back. But what happens if he is suspended but the verdict is that it was not a deliberate act but the result of tainted food. Will he still be stripped or will he once again get a pass?

          • Pietey Trenton

            Good fucking question.. I reckon I know the answer…

          • Fist_ti_cuffs

            They can enforce rules for their titles, but they choose not to because Fishnets AKA kitchen utensils owns the magazine and therefore makes the rules. Do you think lil g would still be the Champ if it were him that (wink, wink) ate contaminated meat?

      • Will Arbuckle

        Indeed, the man who beat the man, neither at that time at 160 lbs. He did not beat the multiple belt holder in Triple, yet still called the ring champ, strange

    • Turner Wednesday

      The Ring belt, like all the others, is worth fuck all anyways. Who cares!

    • DRE

      Monsieur Archambault couldn’t have said it better.

      • Charlie U.

        He is always the standard by which I measure myself to.

    • Will Arbuckle

      I Agree with removing him as ring champ, but, other then Floyd, Lara, and trout, of which the 2nd fight could be called a gift decision, over Lara, who are the elite opponents he has beat??? Khan, Chavez Jr, Smith………there are no elite names on his resume after the 3 mentioned earlier, up until trip, and another gift decision in a draw. Was it 6 fights at a cstchweights, or 7?. He’s been protected since Trout, period.

      • Charlie U.

        Conveniently forgetting GGG and Cotto?? Give the guy some credit.

        • Give Canelo credit? That’s a no-no around here, Charlie.

          • ceylon mooney

            nah, that aint true at all. tons of people who dont like his bullshit give him all the credit in the ring. his resume is fantastic, especially for his age.

  • philoe bedoe

    Short but sweet mailbag Doug.
    Good question about who won the first two rounds in Hagler vs Hearns.
    I’ve never really paid attention to it before, every time I watch it just seems like an 8 minute brawl…………….

    • Andy T

      I could not get my breath watching it let alone score it, talk about feeling each other out for the early rounds. * minute brawl was spot on 🙂

      • philoe bedoe

        Tactics went right out of window In that fight………….

  • Wayne

    Damn Doug
    Are you posting the part 2 of the Monday mailbag later this afternoon?
    Sheesh This gotta be the shortest Monday Mailbag i ever read
    Lol

    • Stephen M

      Must be a by product of that fuzzy brain…

  • ceylon mooney

    “If the commission suspends Canelo at Wednesday’s hearing in Las Vegas, we have no choice but to strip him of our middleweight title. That’s our policy.”

    sometimes the rules domt apply.

    • Koninbeor

      The big issue for me is that he won the belt from Cotto, who should have been stripped of the belt before fighting Alvarez for not fighting at 160 himself. Even so, the belt was given to Canelo whether we like it or not. While I may be able to swallow that pill with a bit of grumbling, Canelo still should have been stripped of the RING title when he dumped the WBC belt.

      • ceylon mooney

        i hear you bro. theres a criteria for being stripped, but the phrasing makes it discretionary: “Here are the seven situations in which a champion can lose his belt” says can lose his belt but not will lose it.

        • Koninbeor

          Yes, it takes a lot of verbal gymnastics to justify why Canelo became the champion to begin with and how he held onto the title for so long. Not that how he won the title to begin with was his fault, that’s on Cotto.

          • Stephen M

            And all the while GGG was the actual man at middleweight and none of the lineal “champions” would fight him…

          • Koninbeor

            I would like to think that Martinez would have but with his knees being so bad, who knows? The excuses used are infuriating to me.

            Cotto: I’m not a true Middleweight. I’m too small. Okay, then vacate the title and drop to 154 where you belong.

            Canelo: I won the title but I’m still a work in progress and I’m not ready to defend the championship against those who deserve a crack at it the most. Okay, then vacate the title and win it when you’re ready to be a real champion.

          • Ten Count Toronto

            Like everyone else, I was guilty of giving Martinez a bit of a free pass for ducking Golovkin, but upon reflection that never made sense. Sure I could accept the rationale after the first surgery and certainly after the second. BUT Golovkin had been owed that fight since 2011 when he became the WBA regular champion. The excuse that GGG wasn’t known enough in North America doesn’t stand up. How many HBO subscribers knew or cared about Dzindziruk, Baker and Macklin?? The Proska fight alone gave GGG more buzz than all three of those guys put together. The truth is Martinez & Dibella ducked Golovkin outright from the beginning.

  • Ramreiz Manuel

    B hop would have taken G to school Hagler would have fuk G up no contest

    • Koninbeor

      I’ve been a GGG fan since his first fight in the USA. I absolutely, positively hated watching Hopkins and rooted against him in nearly every fight I ever saw him in. But fan or no, I don’t see GGG defeating a prime Hopkins.

      • Dug Fisher

        That’s kind of where I stand too. Although GGG never received the opportunity to show how good he really was.

        How anti-fanboy are we?

        • Koninbeor

          I disliked Hopkins because he was incredibly boring and very dirty. He also bemoaned being a boxing outsider when he willingly put himself in that position. I must admit that I rooted for B-Hop whenever he went up against a Don King fighter, though. I always felt Hopkins was in the right regarding the King bias.

          I consider Hopkins to be an ATG but I did not enjoy his fights. Pretty much the same way I feel about Mayweather after the Castillo fight. He got incredibly boring and I didn’t enjoy his fights but he’s certainly one of the best.

          • Dug Fisher

            Agreed, agreed, agreed although, in comparison to Hopkins, I practically worshipped the ground Floyd walked on. In comparison, I must stress.

          • Koninbeor

            I can see why people liked Mayweather even in his later years. Boring as he was, he was still a master of his craft. I doubt we see another quite like him.

          • ceylon mooney

            dude, hes got plenty of exciting fights–u didnt like the pavlik fight?

          • Koninbeor

            I pointed out that he got boring after the Castillo fight. 😉 And yes, he was a lot of fun up to and including Castillo I.

          • ceylon mooney

            hopkins didnt fight castillo.

            good point. yeah. i hate whewn these dudes say that stuff and everyone knows its BS. i gotta say roach is the worst about that “hes gonna knock him out” malarkey.

          • Koninbeor

            I thought you meant Mayweather. Hopkins got boring way, way back.

          • ceylon mooney

            hell mayweather-pacquiao didnt bore me.

          • Koninbeor

            Fair enough. If everyone had the same tastes then we’d never disagree. 🙂

          • ceylon mooney

            HA!i gotta add id never try to convince someone it wasnt boring. uh uh. id lose that argument all day!

        • Ten Count Toronto

          No just the opportunity to perform but also the opportunity to grow and improve from better competition during his best years. Golovkin’s middle and late 20’s were wasted treading in place mostly against fighters a level or two bellow his old amateur competition. That can’t help but be toxic. It says a lot about his self motivation that his fitness never suffered, as well as his ability to learn and improve from gym work alone when he finally hooked up with Sanchez, but it would have been so much better starting that process 4 or 5 years earlier.

      • Dee Money

        I’d favor Hopkins, but these two are close enough in talent level that either could receive a victory. Even if it were 65/35 that means GGG would get one win in a trilogy. I could see him winning via being the aggressor, Hopkins not being allowed to grapple, or KO.

        Hopkins used to be one of my favorites, despite the dirtiness, because I always felt he was a “boxer’s boxer”; and I am a big time fan of GGG (like you I have been a huge fan since day 1)

        • Koninbeor

          I can agree with that. Hopkins isn’t so much better than GGG that it would be determined before they stepped into the ring. GGG would certainly have a chance. I could see GGG possibly winning a match, or at least getting a draw, in a trilogy.

          • Ten Count Toronto

            It would have to be the Hopkins of 2005 or 2006 though. Otherwise I’d have to say I would rule out a Golovkin Win or even Draw based on the body of work we have. Of course the comparison might be unfair because we’ll never know what Golovkin might have been capable of if he had the competition and opportunities earlier in his career.

            It could be that the slow and sheltered first half of Golovkins career protected and built him up, but it could also be that he was denied the opportunity to meet challenges and develop during his best years physically. In my mind he will always remain in large part a stunted and underoptimized career.

      • ceylon mooney

        me neither

    • Michael Montero

      Hopkins best wins at middleweight were against guys coming up in weight.

      • Ten Count Toronto

        So were Golovkins, Haglers, Monzons oand most other Middleweights in living memory. Some of those guys coming up in weight tend to have pretty good careers at middleweight, for example Sugar Ray Robinson.

  • Teddy Reynoso

    How come Rosales appeared the bigger fighter than Higa during the fight when it was he that met the flyweight limit while Higa came at the weigh in two pounds over (and even weighed 120 lbs in the morning of the fight)?

    • Mauro Hermida

      Is very possible that Higa struggled so hard to make weight he cut muscle too.

      • Ten Count Toronto

        Playing the scales can be a double edged sword…

  • Teddy Reynoso

    The Ring panel refused to sanction the recent Nietes vs Reveco fight won wi the Filipino by knockout as for the vacant Ring flyweight championship because of their high regard for Higa whom they rated at number two just behind Nietes. Will they now admit to errors in judgment?

  • Jody Hanna

    I wouldn’t be surprised if even the judges on the night forgot to score the first two rounds of Hagler – Hearns, such was the intensity, especially the first round.
    Then again, Vegas being Vegas, maybe they forget to score rounds at a lot of fights and just make them up afterwards, like Adelaide Byrd and CJ Ross do.

    • Left Hook2

      Or fill them out before the fight…

      • Jody Hanna

        That’s very cynical.

        • Wade Wilson

          How can you be a boxing fan without being a bit of a cynic?

          • DRE

            Goes with the turf.

      • DRE

        I guess if Mrs Byrd was to be the judge for the GGG-Hopkins fight it’s Hopkins by clear 12 round sweep.

        • Left Hook2

          To see the look of dismay on her face when she finds out that it actually ended in the 8th round due to a headbutt and she was the only one who had scored all 12 rounds…

          • DRE

            Well, no one said that math was one of her strong points.

    • DRE

      With wars like Hagler-Hearns it didn’t matter who the judges were or how inept their scorecards might have been. Because the whole thing was taken out of their hands. Needless to say.

  • Colin Mc Flurry.

    WW1.
    WW2.
    Hagler v Hearns.

  • Left Hook2

    Ready to see Rosales again. That was a good scrap. The Murata fight would have been better if that were a different Emmanuelle..in a different setting…

    • william ellis

      Right – As Doug noted, he’s already fought three top fighters and he is just 23. His losses were likely learning experiences and none of them were wipe-outs: an early 4-rounder; a 76-79 loss to Yafai in an 8-rounder; and he knocked Selby down in an eliminator that was closer than the scorecards indicated.

      • Left Hook2

        76-79…is that a bizarre card or what? 4 even rounds? I think that was just the ref scoring it.

        • william ellis

          I have no idea how that score was arrived at.

  • Colin Mc Flurry.

    Hypothetical question.
    If GGG v Saunders fought next would the Ring title be on the line? Or kept on ice until the Ginger returns?

    • Koninbeor

      Golovkin is ranked #1, Jacobs #2, and Saunders #3. I doubt a fight with Saunders would be for THE RING belt unless he moves up to #2 as Jacobs wants another crack at GGG and likely wouldn’t chose not to fight him. Below are the championship conditions from the Rankings page.

      1. THE RING’s Nos. 1 and 2 contenders fight one another.

      2. If the Nos. 1 and 2 contenders chose not to fight one another and
      either of them fights No. 3, No. 4 or No. 5, the winner may be awarded
      THE RING belt if the Editorial Board deems the contenders worthy.

      • D. Gambino

        IMO – once Alvarez is stripped due to PED’s, Ring belt should go to the guy who has the majority of the belts which is Golovkin. That’s just me though… 😉

        • Stephen M

          And it’s not in the rules so will never happen.

          • Koninbeor

            I agree with both of you on this. It would be rather sad for GGG or Saunders to be the undisputed champion and not hold THE RING belt, though.

      • Colin Mc Flurry.

        To be honest I think all rules and regulations will be Trumped – for Canelo’s next available date. probably September.

        I also think team GGG ( Tom loeffler specifically ) will continue to base ( waste ) Golovkin’s career on Canelo. If he’s available for September, I think they’ll keep GGG on the shelf until then.

        Stupidity of the highest order, if that becomes the case.

        • ceylon mooney

          i wish golovkin to shut out alvarez, but the moneys too big.

  • Don Badowski

    Watching the greatest 3 rounds in boxing history again, I agree with the ABC commentator who pointed out the ref was breaking them way too soon, which was hurting Hagler. They were still punching, weren’t tied up, so why the break?

  • Wade Wilson

    The cut was in the middle of Marvin’s forehead which is why it gushed the way it did as the flesh is even thinner against the bone. I always love it when the doctor says to let him go without mucking around.

  • KillaBlu

    I have a question about the Canelo suspension. Luis Very was rightfully removed as ring champion Immediately after he was caught using a banned substance, even tho later the commotion wrongfully sided with his tainted meat story. If the Ring did that to Nery, why didn’t they do that to Canelo? They were caught for using drugs that practically do the same thing but Nery was punished before the commission had given their verdict, why does Canelo get the pleasure of waiting for a verdict that may also go his way? Seems like favoritism to me…

    • ceylon mooney

      they can do it to canelo. they have to want to. in the championship policy it says, “Here are the seven situations in which a champion can lose his belt.” so they can strip canelo, but they dont have to. the wording makes it discretionary.

      however, according to the criteria/rules, canelo absolutely could not have been the champ at 160 in the first place, and neither could cotto.

    • Stephen M

      Doug has said that Nery was stripped because he had a PED in his system while in the ring. This is false and easy to look up. Nery tested positive about 3 or 4 weeks prior to the fight and then tested negative twice closer to the fight. The results came out after the fight.

      The JBC suspended Nery after his recent fight when he didn’t make weight. Will the JBC now suspend Higa?

      • Left Hook2

        I thought about Higa/Nery as well. I doubt the JBC does it (first offense). Plus, he got beat, so any ‘advantage’ was not enough. Oh, and he is not the outsider. I thought Higa looked like he was ashamed to be in the ring after failing to make weight. Or maybe I wanted him to…

  • Reggie Woodard

    Hopkins over Golovkin UD. Not that hard to call really..

    • JV316

      seriously. to paraphrase hopkins, “i’m not gonna wish the kelly pavlik on him”… but i think we know

  • Michael Montero

    A lot of racist Mexicans exposed themselves during the rise of Saul Alvarez.

  • Autosmell

    1 GGG – Bhop??? Hahahahaha!!! Like my homie Old Dirty Bastard say nigga please.

    2. Haggler – Hearns. You see dawgs this is wassup when two bad brothas get down in the ring we talk bout that shit 50 years later. Thats how DNA work.

    3. You aint see us talkin bout Todd Foster vs Homer Gibbons I dont make the rules.

    • DRE

      1. If a prime BHop were around right now and he went on and beat Golovkin you’ll be boasting it was because he’s the badass nigga. All the GGG fans will be saying it was because Hopkins cheated and GGG got old and let him of the hook.

      2. Hagler-Hearns. That was DNA all right. As in kickass good ol’ American DNA. When American fighters ruled the middleweight division.

      3. Who?

  • Colnef

    My life came to a standstill with Hagler-Hearns. I had posters all over the lounge. Hagler was so sure he was going to win and the way to took it to Tommy from the first bell was unreal. He immediately forced Tommy into a more demanding pace and a battle of the better chin – Al Bernstein’s commentary was spot when he said it was about heart and a good chin. The fight was effectively over by the middle of the second but Hagler’s cuts made it enthralling to the end. If Hagler had fought Leonard with the same reckless abandon he would have ko’d him as well.

  • Mark

    Hagler-Hearns is the last fight you’d need any statistics for, but I love how this one backs up what we all saw:

    Power Punches in Round 1
    Hearns 45/61
    Hagler 50/82

    Insane.

    The fact that two true greats would put it all on the line like that … what a gift to fight fans, forever.

  • PrinceGian

    Murata-san wa jouzu ne. The Japanese middleweight would give GGG a tough fight and I would rate him one of the top 5 in the division. Can fight effectively against both boxers and pressure fighters.

    • Stephen M

      Put him in against Lemieux and we will see if he should be top five. Should be a good action fight.

      • Ten Count Toronto

        Murata is already 31 i think the division is passing him by now that Alvarez is there, Charlo & Andrade moving in recently and probably Hurd in the future. he should have been moved more quickly. However I think there’s a good chance Lemieux might be dead at 160 from now on so that fight could present a good opportunity.

  • Dee Money

    I was too young to enjoy Hagler live, I got into the sport just after he was finishing up, but he is one of my all time favorites and I watch his fights all the time.

    Obviously the Hearns fight is amazing, and the SRL fight was historic, but I always feel these mislead people as to what type of fighter MMH really was (causing viewers to see him as some sort of blood and guts, slow reflexed brawler). I like the prime Hagler (early 80s) a lot more, that fighter was a boxing virtuoso; and this may be biased but I think he is often underrated historically speaking.

    I find it interesting that he is mentioned so prominently in the mailbag along with GGG as there are some interesting similarities between the two. Now don’t get me wrong, MMH is clearly a level up, but there are similarities: Both, as of now, fought their entire careers as MWs, and were seen as boogeymen of the division while in their prime. Both struggled earlier in their career to secure big fights, often being avoided and struggling to win at the politics of the sport. Both had career defining fights against fighters who moved up in weight to face them. And as mentioned above, it appears that both will be remembered most for fights they had at the end of their careers when they were somewhat different fighters.

    • Ten Count Toronto

      His jab and very sophisticated use of switch hitting (during his best athletic years) don’t get the respect & appreciation they deserve.

      However don;’t neglect to chase down the videos of his wars with Briscoe & Hart.

  • Pietey Trenton

    Canelo gets stripped of the ring belt… GGG puts him on the shelf, beats bjs for the unification, rematches Jacobs with the rehydration cluase and fucking hammers him, teases canelo with a rematch.. then renegs and beats Ramirez for the super middleweight title, then, forces obscene concessions from canelo in negotiations, 60/40 for ggg, fightsvat msg, rehydration cluase, the whole gambit, hammers him, and retires. That would make me happy.

  • Teddy Reynoso

    And I thought that on this site, we can have an intelligent discussion on boxing that would help educate the casuals or the uninitiated to the sport.
    But here we read of posts that slam the Ring for recognizing Cotto and Canelo as middleweight champion for their failure to fight at full limit of 160 ( until Golovkin in the case of Canelo).
    Here we read of fight at 155 as not a middleweight fight but a catch weight (admittedly but still in the middleweight, in truth and in fact).
    Here we read of fighters not required to come in and fight at the full limit of 160 but fights below it, even as agreed upon mutually and sanctioned as for the championship, cannot be considered as legit middleweight title fight.
    Here we read of one claiming that the Cotto-Pacquiao WBO welterweight title fight as ” bogus” because it was set at 145 and not at 147.(If that’s the case then woe to Henry Armstrong for he weighed just between 138 and 142 lbs in all his long reign at welterweight, which is bogus if we are to believe that claim).
    And despite these, we never have Dougie butting in to share his wisdomful takes on the matter.

    • Dee Money

      “If that’s the case then woe to Henry Armstrong for he weighed just between 138 and 142 lbs in all his long reign at welterweight, which is bogus if we are to believe that claim.”

      I don’t think anyone here has discredited Armstrong in any ways for coming in beneath the sanctioned weight limit as a choice or outcome of the training. Nor do I think that is relevant to the complaints against title fights being fought at catchweights.
      Armstrong defended his title against fighters who weighed near the limit so he wasn’t mandating that his opponent fight for a title at a catchweight.

      When people argue against Canelo is that he has never won a middleweight bout where his opponent was allowed to fight at the middleweight limit. Once again this is a material difference to your Armstrong reference.

      Now, odes this mean he is not a great fighter? That GGG’s resume is better than Hopkins’s? No. But specifically to the dictated catchweight arguments you are making your arguments are apples to oranges.

      • Teddy Reynoso

        In fairness you immediately got my drift. But in the case of Canelo and Pacquiao and Floyd as well as Leonard’s before him, the catchweight condition has been the result of the cash cow superstars exercising privilege and imposing themselves on the lesser name opposition who had to access to it primarily for monetary reasons. But even then as the catch weight fights still fell within specific divisional limits, they were still valid for the championship or whatever purposes they serve for those particular weight classes. If ever there are issues about them, it is the various sanctioning organizations which should be criticized, rightly or not, for authorizing these championship or major catch weight fights.

  • Mpaz15

    This “Mike in Japan” punk sounds like one of those losers who go to Asia with a superiority complex and hatred for Asians.