Thursday, January 18, 2018  |

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Dougie’s Friday mailbag (Joshua-Wilder, the heavyweights, Amir Khan, Okolie-Chamberlain)

12
Jan

MAKE ONE DREAM FIGHT

Yo Dougie,

Happy New Year to you and yours, here’s to a prosperous 2018!

A very short question for you (for once). If you could play matchmaker and make one dream fight in 2018, irrespective of promotional or purse split barriers, what would it be, why, and who would you favour to win?

Looking forward to what will hopefully be another stellar year for the noble art and no doubt another great year for the mailbag! All the best mate. – Mike, England

Thanks for the start-of-the-year positivity, Mike. It is appreciated.

This is an easy three-part question (well, at least the first two parts are). If I could make one dream fight happen this year it would be the heavyweight showdown between Anthony Joshua and Deontay Wilder because it’s the biggest boxing event that can come together. It would create massive general sports interest in the U.K. and the U.S., it would generate obscene amounts of revenue, and given the styles and strengths (and weaknesses) of the two unbeaten titleholders, it would make for an intense, entertaining and potentially explosive/dramatic fight once the bell sounds for Round 1. It goes without saying that Joshua-Wilder would be a boon for boxing worldwide. (And to make it even more interesting – and to help set up what happens next – I would insist on having Tyson Fury serve as one of the international broadcasters and partake in some of the fight-week public media events.)

Who do I think wins? Joshua, by late TKO, but I wouldn’t bet a lot of money ($$$ or £££) on that opinion.

 

HEAVYWEIGHT PICKS

Hi Dougie,

I see in Monday’s mailbag that you pick Joshua and Wilder to win their upcoming fights. I mostly agree except I give Luis Ortiz a pretty good chance. Joseph Parker has a chance too but maybe not as much – it’s all about Joshua’s chin. The heavyweight division is looking up for the first time in a long time. Sure wish there weren’t so many meaningless titles! I like one champion like it was in the 50s & 60s. Hope “The Ring” magazine gets their heavyweight rankings updated. I think there are better fighters to be on the list than Dominic Breazeale and Andy Ruiz. Maybe even Dillian Whyte. Here are some fun mythical matchups:

  1. Miller vs Povetkin
  2. Povetkin vs Pulev
  3. Whyte vs Miller
  4. Fury vs Joshua
  5. Fury vs Wilder

Who are your picks? Keep up the great work and congrats on your promotion. – Mike

Thanks for the kind words, Mike.

Miller vs Povetkin – Povetkin by close but unanimous decision.

Povetkin vs Pulev – Povetkin by late stoppage in an entertaining fight.

Whyte vs Miller – Miller by close (maybe controversial) decision in a competitive boxing match that’s almost as entertaining as its promotional build-up.

Fury vs Joshua – Fury by decision (provided he can get at least one tune-up bout, ideally two, and keep his head on straight going into the showdown). I’ll go with Joshua by decision if Fury were to go straight in the fight.

Fury vs Wilder – Same as above.

I see in Monday’s mailbag that you pick Joshua and Wilder to win their upcoming fights. I mostly agree except I give Luis Ortiz a pretty good chance. Joseph Parker has a chance too but maybe not as much – it’s all about Joshua’s chin. You’re not out of line for thinking that way. Joshua’s chin (and stamina) have appeared shaky at times, and Parker’s an aggressive fighter who can punch (and take a shot). Wilder has his share of technical flaws, and Ortiz is a good combination puncher with a lot of power. However, AJ has survived his wobbly moments (and the knockdown vs. Klitschko) and grown from those experiences (as he has from being taken into the late rounds in his last two bouts). He’s a better technician than Parker, as well as the bigger, taller and rangier of the two. And despite Wilder’s sometimes raw offensive bursts, he’s good at establishing range and moving when he needs to. I think his lateral movement, speed (and ultimately, his vaunted power) will be too much for the Cuban. But we’ll see.

The heavyweight division is looking up for the first time in a long time. There are enough respected players to make for a very entertaining round robin for the next three or four years.

Sure wish there weren’t so many meaningless titles! I like one champion like it was in the 50s & 60s. It appears as though the sport is working toward crowning an undisputed heavyweight champion by 2019. Three belts are on the line with Joshua-Parker. And the biggest, most lucrative machups that can be made in the sport are Joshua-Wilder or Fury-Joshua, so I expect to see these fights happen eventually.

Hope “The Ring” magazine gets their heavyweight rankings updated. I think there are better fighters to be on the list than Dominic Breazeale and Andy Ruiz. Maybe even Dillian Whyte. The current heavyweight scene is pretty strong at the top but it’s not the deepest division in boxing; the bottom half of the top 10 is comprised of fighters that are flawed (Breazeale, Whyte), inactive (Ruiz) and unproven (Jarrell Miller). However, who would you have us replace these contenders with? Hughie Fury? Agit Kabayel? Am we missing a young up-and-comer deserving of a spot in THE RING’s top 10, or even a mature veteran, such as Carlos Takam? I’m listening.

 

RETURN OF KING KHAN

Hi Doug,

Hope you had a nice break.

Didn’t see this coming! Amir Khan signed with Matchroom Boxing.

I think it’s a brilliant move. I think signing with Al Harmon was a massive mistake for Amir. He seemed to have a really good relationship with Golden Boy, but he had Floyd Mayweather clearly in his sights and only Uncle Al can deliver that. Apparently?? Also, it was GBP who set up the Canelo Alvarez fight, which Amir made a ton of money for.

If you ask me, Floyd Mayweather never wanted to fight a prime Amir Khan. I’m not saying Floyd isn’t the favourite in that fight, but Amir would have been a nightmare for him with his hand and foot speed and an exceptional engine.

I mean, with all due respect, to fight Marcos Maidana, someone Khan beat, and Andre Berto over Khan?? His own fans from the Twitterverse chose Amir Khan.

Also, Manny has been maneuvered away from Khan in recent years I think.

I think the move to Matchroom will be great for Amir. Eddie really knows what he’s doing, and Amir needs a team like this to steer his carrier. Also, back on Sky Sports in the U.K. Interesting that Eddie is looking to increase his profile in the U.S. Amir is well known in the U.S. and gives Matchroom a further opportunity in addition to promoting Daniel Jacobs.

Eddie Hearn is saying 3 fights this year. Who would you like to see him in with?

My pics are:

1)      Garcia rematch

2)      Spence

3)      Thurman

All at 147.

I think a prime Khan beats all three. Let’s see if he takes a tune up first? None can match him for speed for skill, but Amir’s vulnerabilities make these exciting fights.

We also need to see if Amir is still in prime form after two years off and 3 hand operations? Has the time off done him good or hindered him?

Wouldn’t mind seeing the Manny fight either and I think Amir makes mincemeat of Jeff Horn. As long as that fight is in the U.K./U.S. Shawn Porter would be interesting. I think both are a nightmare for each other. Might make for a great fight?

Where does this leave Khan Vs Brook? Which every Englishman and his dog wants to see? I just feel Amir has bigger and harder fights in front of him. With all due respect to Kell, I think it’s an easy night’s work for Amir. Amir s just too fast and too experienced at the top level. Will be a similar performance to the one against Devon Alexander. If both can have a good 2018 and can agree a catch weight, egos aside, this would then be huge in early 2019. But it’s a big money fight in the UK so might happen earlier.

Good to hear he’s staying with Virgil Hunter and Tony Brady. I think they make a good team. All the best to you and your family for the new year. Keep up the good work. – Tabraze, London, UK

Thanks, Tabraze. Wow. I knew you were an Amir Khan fan but I didn’t you “fancied” him THAT much. You really think he would beat Danny Garcia, Errol Spence Jr. and Keith Thurman in succession? That a Fighter-of-the-Year-lock schedule if it were all to happen in 2018. And if he were to win, of course. I’d give him a shot at outpointing Garcia, provided Hunter (who I agree does a good job with Khan) can keep him boxing a disciplined fight, but I would favor Spence and Thurman to beat your guy. And that doesn’t mean I don’t think he would trouble them. He would – until he got clipped.

I agree that his speed, boxing style and overall athleticism would have been frustrating for the superstar duo of Floyd and Manny, but I still would have favored the future hall of famers to beat him.

Amir Khan and Ppromoter Eddie Hearn. Photo by Mark Robinson.

I also agree that Matchroom Boxing and Khan should make for a good team. Hearn will get Khan back on a regular fighting schedule, bring the Bolton native back to the U.K. for at least one of the bouts of three-fight deal, and he’s proven to be able to work with most of the promotional players in the U.S.

Khan says he’s “determined to win another world championship.” Hearn says he has a plan for Khan to fight all three bouts this year – a scheduled April 21 comeback fight, an August/September date and then a “superfight” in winter. Hearn says “the target is to provide him with the biggest fights possible with a mouthwatering list of names including the likes of Manny Pacquiao, Kell Brook, Keith Thurman and Errol Spence,” but I think the April 21 bout will come against British-level fighter – such as Sam Eggington – and I think they can pass that off to Sky Sports because Khan is coming off a long layoff (not to mention a devastating KO loss) and the fight would likely take place in England.

The second fight would be the title bout. I think they’ll make an offer to Horn, whose management probably isn’t all that enthused with Top Rank’s plan of putting him in with Terence Crawford. If the WBO titleholder isn’t available, they’ll go after Haymon’s two studs, Spence and Thurman. Regardless of what happens in the title bout, I think the third fight (whether it happens in 2018 or 2019) will be against Brook at 154 pounds.

 

TEWA KIRAM

Hey Doug, just wanted to get your thoughts on Tewa Kiram. I hadn’t heard of him before his fight with Lucas Mathysse was announced so I checked out one of his more recent fights on youtube. He’s a fairly meat and potatoes type of fighter but he does have quite a nice left stick, very stiff and accurate, along with a tight high guard defense with a little bob and sway to it.

It’s also interesting to see he’s undefeated, as my understanding is they throw you to the wolves pretty early in your career in Thailand. Maybe this means he’s got the durability and toughness to hang with The Machine long enough to get his jab rhythm going? – Jack

Kiram is on the attack against Joel De La Cruz.

Kiram certainly has the looks of a strong and durable fighter, but despite being 38-0, he’s never been in with a veteran of Matthysse’s class and punching power. And that’s not to say that he was babied or protected in Thailand. He was fighting 12 rounders against experienced fighters by his sixth pro bout, but it’s hard to find quality opposition heavier than featherweight in Thailand. I think Kiram was well developed – he’s got a good jab (as you pointed out), solid balance, decent footwork and head movement – but he’s never been in the ring with anyone he wasn’t supposed to beat.

The only name on his resume is Kaizer Mabuza, but the former 140-pound contender from South African was on the slide (and was 2-8 in his previous 10 bouts – although it should be noted that Mabuza had been in with very good opposition). Mabuza took Kiram the full 12, which was good experience for the Thai standout.

Can he hang with The Machine? I don’t know, but I’m not going to count Kiram out. I’ve witnessed too many unknown Thai fighters give the favorites hell when traveling to the U.S. over the decades. The only time I can recall when a Thai fighter wasn’t competitive (or, at the very least, tough) was when Jorge Arce blew out former Pacquiao conqueror Medgoen Singsurat in one round in December 2007 in New Mexico (the Top Rank “Latin Fury” PPV show that bout was on was my first professional broadcast experience). However, in Arce’s very next fight, in Aguascalientes, Mexico, he was taken the distance by another Thai national, Devid Lookmahanak, who I thought deserved to win the decision. (Arce won a razor-thin majority decision in the headliner to another “Latin Fury” show that I worked.)

Two of my favorite Thai travelers are Ratanachai Sor Vorapin (who won a bantamweight belt and lost it to Jhonny Gonzalez in Tucson, Arizona in 2005) and Terdsak Jandaeng, who helped turn Juan Manuel Marquez into an action fighter with their shootout in Lake Tahoe in August 2006. They seldom won (although, I recall Sor Vorapin outworked Danny Romero on the Hopkins-Trinidad undercard) but they always made their opponents work hard for the victory.

Of course, Srisaket Sor Rungvisai recently reminded the world that Thailand sometimes produces world-beater talent.

I’ll never forget witnessing (as a fan) Saman Sorjaturong knock out hall of famer Humberto “Chiquita” Gonzalez at The Forum in 1995. He went on to have a long, respectable 108-pound title reign. I’m sure Kiram will do his best to capture that upset magic in the same venue 23 years later. Anyone who thinks he can’t do it should keep this in mind, that he is 10 years younger than the 35-year-old Matthysse, who has been in his share of punishing fights.   

 

BRITISH BEEF

Hi Dougie,

Hope you are well and you and the family had a good holiday period.

I was wondering if the “British Beef”, Lawrence Okolie (7-0) vs Isaac Chamberlain (9-0) fight had crossed your radar? Promoted by the irrepressible Eddie Hearn, who could sell wool to sheep, it’s two young, talented UK boxers with potentially bright futures going head to head. Okolie an Olympic standout who appears to possess real power and Chamberlain a slick athletic boxer. I’m impressed they’ve both put it on the line at such an early stage in their career, especially in a period where the “0” can apparently mean so much. Do you agree whoever loses still has a potentially bright future in the game?

I also wondered if you can remember other talented young standouts fighting each other at such an early stage in their career? Also has there been a time where the loser has gone on to win a world title(s)?

Finally have you got a prediction for the fight? I fancy Chamberlain – he’s a good technical boxer and while Okolie can certainly bang, he sometimes looks a bit upright and static which makes me think he may struggle to land on an opponent who’s more fluid. Plus, Chamberlain boxes out of my local gym so gotta support the Brixton boy!

Cheers and all the best! – Peter, London

I don’t have a prediction for Okolie-Chamberlain, Peter. I’m not familiar enough with the cruiserweight prospects to make a pick, but I’m aware of the fight and I think it’s great that the grudge match has attracted as much attention in your neck of the woods (the greater London area?) as it has.

“British Beef” sort of reminds me of when George Groves and James DeGale fought as prospects in 2011. They were a little more advanced (Groves was 12-0; DeGale was 10-0) but I recall there being a U.K. buzz about the fight. That super middleweight showdown of London natives is an example of the loser of such an early matchup going on to win a world title. Both of them did, but DeGale won his belt two years earlier than Groves (who beat Chunky via razor-thin majority decision as I’m sure you know). Of course, he just lost his world title to one of Minnesota’s finest, Caleb Truax.

Speaking of Minnesota, here’s an extreme example of the loser of an early prospect showdown going on to win a world-title honors. Will Grigsby, a tough and talented Minnesotan, faced 1988 Olympic silver medalist Michael Carbajal when he was 1-0. Carbajal, who is now in the hall of fame, was making his pro debut. Grigsby dropped a four-round decision to the Arizona legend, but “Steel Will” went on to win two world titles at 108 pounds and took another future hall of famer, Finito Lopez, the distance in one of his world title fights.

Anyway, from what I know of Okolie and Chamberlain, your analysis of their strengths and weaknesses is “spot on.” Okolie’s got the more extensive amateur background but Chamberlain comes from a fighting family. Okolie is taller and rangier, but Chamberlain appears to be the more polished boxer. Okolie is the more aggressive, harder puncher, but he’s also visibly tense in his fights. Chamberlain always looks relaxed in the ring, plus he’s got guts, he won a 10-round bout after suffering a dislocated shoulder early in the fight.

I think Okolie is probably the odds/media favorite but I can see your prediction coming to fruition if Chamberlain can keep his composure and take him past five or six rounds.

Regardless of what happens on Feb. 3, I agree that the loser of the contest will likely have a bright future.

 

FILIPINO RIGHT-HANDED SOUTHPAWS 

Happy New Year my friend! I lost ur number so I’m just emailing you.

But still mailbaging, you know.

If you noticed, all great Filipino fighters are all left handed… Elorde, Navarette, the Penalosas (Dodie Boy, Gerry), Malcolm Tunacao, then MannyPac… they are all right handed, but switched to southpaw when boxing. – Anthony

Thanks for the New Year’s wish, and for that tidbit of information on some of the southpaw champs/legends from the Philippines, old friend. 

I was surprised to learn how many southpaw standouts over the past 40 years are actually natural right handers.

 

 

Email Fischer at [email protected]. Follow him on Twitter at @dougiefischer

  • Teddy Reynoso

    All Filipino fighters who become world champions at junior lightweight namely Gabriel Flash Elorde, Rene Barrientos, Ben Villaflor, Rolando Navarette and Manny Pacquiao are southpaw.

    • TMT NYC-DA REAL GHOSTBUSTERS

      Which hand does Manny use to sign all those Filipino congressional documents?

      • Teddy Reynoso

        With his left hand, I believe.

    • Jeremy, UK

      The first Filipino fighter I became aware of was Rolando Bohol. What do you remember of him?

      • Teddy Reynoso

        He won the IBF flyweight title back in the late 80s beating no less than the South Korean Chang Ho Chou, conqueror of the great Dodie Boy Penalosa in 1988.’ But he did not last long as champion as after a initial successful defense, he lost the crown to Duke McKenzie in London in 1989. That’s probably why you know him.

        • Jeremy, UK

          Indeed it is. I remember an emotional McKenzie telling the post fight interviewer through tears , “I thought he was going to knock me out!”

          • Teddy Reynoso

            UK and the Philippines have their own stories rivalry in pro boxing especially in the lighter weights dating back to the days of Pancho Villa vs Jimmy Wilde and Small Montana vs that Irish fighter whose name escapes me for the moment through Frank Cedeno vs Charlie Magri, Bohol vs McKenzie, Penalosa vs Dave McAuley, Johnriel Casimero vs Charlie Edwards and the recent Jerwin Ancajas vs Michael Conlan. And who would forget, Pacquiao vs Hatton?

          • Jeremy, UK

            Hatton would like to forget that! He was unfortunate to be facing Pacquiao at his absolute peak. Next chapter – Frampton vs Doniare!

          • Teddy Reynoso

            Aye!

  • Angus Murray-smith

    Imagine if heavyweights fought as often as the 60’s or even the 90’s. That’s how to get as big as Tyson

    • Stephen M

      Imagine if any weights fought that much! Good times!

  • Jorge

    If Khan plans to fight those 3 fights… Garcia, Thurman, then Spence. He wont make it to the 2nd fight. He needs a tune up and reality check of what has happened to him in the ring. Canelo v.GGG is happening again in May. So much for all those guys that said he wouldn’t fight him again anytime soon. He might not be liked by a lot of folks but he fights the best.

    • ceylon mooney

      i do think that khan woulda been the toughest guy for mayweather at 147. woulda been hell on bradley, too.

    • Juan Manuel Valverde

      Why would he get any of those fights? He’s no longer with the PBC and back then when he was with them he couldn’t get them!

      • Jorge

        Yeah I was just replying to the super Amir fan Tabraze’s email.

  • TMT NYC-DA REAL GHOSTBUSTERS

    Khan’s biggest fight will be against Anthony Joshua…..in a U.K. courtroom!

    • DRE

      Another in the “loss” column for Khan.

  • Barley’s back!!!

    Amir Khan more skilled than Errol Spence! lol.

    Some fans are far too easily swayed by speed, which Khan was blessed with an abundance of. He never did shake a plethora of amateurish technical failings though, which were masked to some degree by that speed. It was never just about that shaky chin. Inconsistent judgement of distance and poor anticipation in the ring were equally as fatal.

    Spence is a far more complete pro fighter, even if he has yet to compile the resume that Khan has.

    • Left Hook2

      If it was just about speed, the quick-twitch fighters would win every time. That surely does not happen.

      • ceylon mooney

        they say timing beats speed. speed kills, tho.

        • Left Hook2

          The classic confrontations that come to mind to me are Taylor-Chavez, Judah-Tszyu, Castillo-Mayweather 1. Speed is definitely a huge advantage, but it is not an absolute.

          • wrecksracer

            Judah-Tszyu always makes me laugh. I swear if those guys fought 10 times, the same thing would happen every time. Including the tantrum afterwards.

          • Left Hook2

            Best version of the ‘happy dance’ I have seen!

          • Teddy Reynoso

            The chicken dance was coined after Zab did his loser version of the Hitler victory jig.

          • Barley’s back!!!

            I agree. Zab looked like the best fighter in the world for 3 minutes, but didn’t possess anywhere near the required discipline to correct the mistakes that saw him get whacked out by Tszyu shortly after.

          • Barley’s back!!!

            And you know what, to a lesser extent, I’d add Khan-Garcia to that list, though it was hardly a ‘classic’ matchup.
            Amir had his way with Danny for a few rounds with that incredible advantage in hand speed but, it became clear to a keen eye that Garcia was getting closer and closer with the timing of his left hook until it paid off in the 4th. That was no fluke like pro-Khan fans like to pretend it was, and I’ve had picked Danny to win a rematch too, because he had the chin to eat the fast leather whilst setting up his more meaningful shots.

          • Left Hook2

            Excellent point. Garcia looked pretty clueless for a few rounds..and then boom with the counter.

          • ozzy

            I can’t remember anybody saying it was a fluke but I can remember people saying it wasn’t a chin shot as some claimed – which it wasn’t. I think the evidence was that Virgil Hunter improved Khan’s boxing following the Garcia defeat (eg: Collazo & Alexander fights) and so I’m not so sure that Garcia would have beaten Khan in a rematch, btw it was the speed of Khan’s footwork that Garcia found difficult to cope with not so much his hand speed. I can remember “experts” saying Garcia would KO Peterson however Peterson found it fairly easy to outbox Garcia who was given a bit of a gift, so there’s no reason to suppose a more interested & determined Khan couldn’t have done similarly & avoid the Garcia left hook.

          • DRE

            Guys like Chavez, Castillo and Tszyu would have been a real nightmare for Khan.

          • Bar Kokhba

            Excellent examples (though I think Castillo-Mayweather was more an issue of distance than timing; Castillo was so far up in Floyd’s grill he rendered timing almost useless).

            But one I’d add to the list is Forrest-Mosley. Classic example of the slower guy scoring more often and more effectively – strictly due to timing and accuracy.

          • Left Hook2

            That’s a good one too. He timed it pretty well, too.. JM Marquez had excellent timing as well…and not just the punch that put Pac to sleep.

          • Bar Kokhba

            Probably the best example of all! Marquez had decent hand speed, but he was never blindingly fast. Yet because of his timing, accuracy and mastery of distance, he was able to stay on even terms for four fights with Manny Pacquiao – one of the fastest fighters of the past few decades.

        • Rude Boy

          Nah. That was a fluke. Zab was tatttoing Kosta before he got too confident marching backwards with his hands down.

          • Mauro Hermida

            Sorry bro, but you are dead wrong. Zab landed one good uppercut in round 1 and by round 2 Kostya was timing him. In no way was that a fluke. Kostya was elite for a reason. Zab would get blasted out now if Kostya came out of retirement. He would never beat that dude in a million years. Kostya was just a MUCH better fighter.

          • Stephen M

            I just realized that I’ve only seen that fight and maybe another one with Tszyu. I’ll have to find some of his fights.

          • ceylon mooney

            dam fantstic fan friendly knockdown

          • wrecksracer

            Judah always found a way to lose his biggest fights. He tried to get up too quick and ended up doing a chicken dance of epic and historic proportions. Had he made it to the later rounds, he would have slowed down like he always did and lost anyway.

      • Barley’s back!!!

        Absolutely. I remember Tracy Patterson blasting out Eddie Hopson in double quick time, a prime example of a fighter with much stronger fundamentals outclassing a much faster, more athletic guy.
        Khan’s never had strong fundamentals, but he’s got speed to burn, masses of heart, and I do rate his performances against Maidana and Judah particularly highly.

    • Ten Count Toronto

      Not just poor judgement of distance, poor judgement in general, and the inability to accept the fact that he needed to dedicate himself to being a runner in the ring.

      Having said that, he has very few losses, and for the brief time he was focused on executing the style he is best suited to , he succeeded in punking out a prime Tim Bradley which is no small accomplishment.

      • ceylon mooney

        howd khan punk out bradley?

        • Barley’s back!!!

          It did appear that Bradley was reluctant to face Khan, but then Timmy did rise in weight to chase a bigger threat in Pacquiao.

        • Ten Count Toronto

          Bradley pulled out of a Khan fight in late 2011. Apparently he had already been approached about a possible Pacquiao fight in 2012 and it seemed he considered the fight too risky to jeopardize the shot at Pacquiao.

          The only other explanation is that Top Rank wanted Bradley-Pacquiao so much that Arum insisted on scrapping Khan-Bradley because HE though it was too risky and Bradley agreed to keep his mouth shut and not defend himself against charges he was ducking Khan – which doesn;t sound like Tim Bradley but considering the money at stake he might have agreed – still he’s got to won it.

          • ceylon mooney

            oh wow. i dint know about any of this. both explainations fit the circumstances pretty good.

    • DRE

      Good point regarding Khan’s shaky chin not being his only downfall. His lack of defense and even bigger lack of ring smarts also factor in why Khan just couldn’t win the big one. Even in the Khanelo fight Khan got clearly outsmarted in that fight as well as overpowered. Canelo just timed him perfectly and BOOM!

      Another thing. It’s true that Spence still has yet to fight the overall level of guys that Khan fought but I but I think that Spence’s beatdown of Kell Brook handily trumps Khan’s biggest wins at welter. Who did Khan beat at 147? Devon Alexander and Chris Algieri.

      • Barley’s back!!!

        Canelo outboxed Khan like I knew he would, before dropping the bomb. People who think Amir was winning that fight for 5 rounds just don’t what to look at.

        Spence’s win over Brook was very, very impressive to me.

        • Andy T

          Spence win sticks out for me as a very impressive win Spence knocks out chumbawamba (I get knocked down but get up again) Khan

        • ozzy

          LOL it’s Harold “I know everything” Lederman or is it Adalaide “I love Canelo” Byrd – either way if you think Canelo took the first 4 rounds you’re awarding rounds to a fighter who barely connected – luckily for Khan!
          You seem to have the perfect qualifications for judging the Canelo-GGG rematch, give Bob Bennett a ring, you and Adalaide would make a golden boy judging dream team – ffs you’re a real expert LOL!

      • Conrad

        Why compare his wins at welter? Khan’s best accomplishments are at super light weight so if you wanna make a fair comparison you should start there. When he beat Alexander it was seen as a 50/50 fight and Alexander wasn’t washed up like he is now, so have some perspective

    • Will Arbuckle

      The things khan does threat, are better then the things Spence does great. Spence does a lot of things very well…..the difference maker is khan chin

      • Mauro Hermida

        Khan isn’t hard to hit. As slow as Maidana looked, Khan was very lucky that the fight wasn’t stopped on multiple occasions. Im fair but firm gave him all the slack in the world.

    • Kudos

      Amir Khan has the most demented fan base in boxing.

    • ozzy

      Whether you’re exaggerating or not about Khan’s plethora of amateurish technical failings it would be very helpful to many of us if you could list these failings – there’s plenty of room & I’m sure Doug won’t mind – thanks in advance Barley 😉

      Personally I think Virgil Hunter dealt very well with some of Khan’s failings as was demonstrated in him out-boxing Alvarez for 4 or 5 rounds. IMHO the worst problem Khan had/has was not his chin or any boxing technicality, it was that he couldn’t concentrate 100% throughout a contest – he lost focus and didn’t see the punch(es) coming. He now seems very keen on boxing again and I’m hoping that this has improved his concentration skills – if so I do think he has the boxing skills & speed to be a force again at 147lbs, but if his concentration is as bad as before, or heaven forbid worse, then he clearly won’t last very long. Nice to hear from you again Barley.

  • ceylon mooney

    UK fighters are a LOT more willing to face each other than their US counterparts. quigg-frampton was an exception. hell, in the US NO ONE faces each other on the way up. if spence, thurman and garcia were brits weda already had rematches on all those fights.

    • philoe bedoe

      I think over here we do get a lot more unbeaten fighters fighting each other on the way up.
      But British rivalry always sales over here, I don’t think you get that sort of rivalry in the states…………

      • Barley’s back!!!

        Ah, Benn-Eubank on Saturday night prime time terrestrial TV. Happy memories. I think the viewing figures approached 15 million!

        • philoe bedoe

          Those were the good old days when boxers back then were household names…………..

  • ceylon mooney

    in definitely a fan of khan the boxer. khan the media personality and khan the ankle biter (pacquiao, mayweather, etc) are nauseating personas. my god. ugh. if i could ONLY hear about this guy when he was about to step in the ring id like him. hes worse than haye.

    • Charlie U.

      Eh, imagine what it would be if you lived in the UK. He must be like the Kardashian of British sports. Amir Khandashian. Hahaha.

      • ceylon mooney

        HAW HAW HAW!

        in our country, we have only one kardashian, but one is all we can stomach!

        dayum

        • Charlie U.

          One is too much!

          • DRE

            Well we’re still stuck with those other Kardashians. They’re like the Ozbourne kids. Making it big on TV despite the obvious lack of talent. The difference is that the Kardashians have the looks while it for the Ozbournes it was the last name.

      • Juan Manuel Valverde

        Funny

      • philoe bedoe

        Has a fellow Brit I have no problem with him.
        A lot of Brits do, but for me he’s an exciting fighter to watch…………

        • Charlie U.

          Agree, I have zero problem with him as a fighter. I was talking more about the reality TV aspect of his life.

          • philoe bedoe

            That doesn’t bother me too much either.
            He’s entertaining to me, but I get where your coming from……..

          • Charlie U.

            Didn’t he accuse AJ of banging his wife?

          • philoe bedoe

            Yeah he did, but he later apologised.
            Wouldn’t fancy the thought of Joshua banging my wife lol, for a number of different reasons………….

          • AngelMorningstar

            Lol

      • Stash One

        To be honest we dont see that much of him, he fancies himself as more of an international star. although he was on a reality show here recently that no-one comes back from, end of the road stuff.

  • Ten Count Toronto

    Khan would get killed fighting Garcia, Thurman or Spence today. Even if he got smart and accepted the fact that he needs to stick & run 3 minutes of every round , he no longer has the speed and athletic ability to leave those guys in the dust the way he might have a few years ago.

    Khan’s best bet is to fluff his record with a couple of safe fights and play it into a domestic fight with Brook or Smith.

    If he want a world title shot, go for Lara at 154. I thought Lara old against Gausha but in any case any version of Lara will fight an economical and sleepy fight in which Khan can go the distance without taking a lot of punishment (unless he insists on making himslef an available targeet once again)

    • Left Hook2

      Agree totally.

    • philoe bedoe

      Good call on Khan vs Lara, a fight I’d give Amir a great chance of winning.
      He likes those boxer types, struggles with punchers and pressure fighters…………

  • Charlie U.

    Did we find the biggest Amir Khan fan in the world with Tabraze or is he just a member of Khan’s family?

    • Juan Manuel Valverde

      Maybe its Khan disguised as a fan

      • Charlie U.

        Could be.

      • DRE

        All part of Khan’s master plan to make himself actually matter again.

      • Kudos

        I agree Ernesto.

    • Mauro Hermida

      Maybe he just really loves the smell of Khan’s nutbag.

  • Juan Manuel Valverde

    Man, Amir Khan fans sometimes make me want to hate him, but I don’t anymore. What makes you think that he can get a fight with Thurman, Spence or Garcia, all Haymon clients when at the time he was with PBC he didn’t get them?
    I would favor all three of them to beat him, Spence to actually destroy him.

    • Jeremy, UK

      I agree that Spence and Thurman would definitely catch up with Khan and get him out of there… not so sure about Garcia though. In their first fight, Khan was giving him a lesson early and Garcia was getting busted up pretty good. All that changed with one well timed left hook, but under Hunter, Khan has been much more defensive (and not as interesting IMO.) Would give him a good chance winning a rematch.

      • Juan Manuel Valverde

        For two rounds? Come on man… lots of fighters need a couple of rounds to set up. Thats not enough to convince that he can beat him. Garcia is much better than given credit and Khan much worse than people think.

        • Jeremy, UK

          For two rounds yes, but look at the state of Garcia’s face after 2 rounds! Khan had respectable power at 140lbs, but is more awkward at 147 and still just as fast. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t think Khan is in the P4P league – but neither is Garcia

      • Kudos

        I agree, Khan was doing great until Garcia accidentally stopped him.

    • Yeah, Spence vs. Khan would be nasty. Everybody knows this. You know what I respect about Khan? He’d fight him any damn way.

  • Jorge

    A lot people from shithole countries in the comments section.
    Signed. Donald.

    • Ciscostudent561

      hahahahah so true
      wait do you mean Don B, or the other donald

      • Jorge

        mr trump

  • Stash One

    Jesus, that Khan letter !!!! that’s got to be a wind-up. LOL
    Garcia, Spence then Thurman ! LOL, its too good,
    Top trolling.

    • Andy T

      I thought it really good of Amir to post 😂😂😂

  • Ciscostudent561

    Swift MM
    Khan Hurd 154
    Brook Hurd 154
    Loma DSG 147
    Mikey Garcia DSG 147
    Horn DSG 147

    • Left Hook2

      Khan every time. From what we learned from the email, he is as automatic as RJJ, Duran, Ali, and Bob Foster. Just kidding, letter writer.
      Hurd, Hurd, Loma, Mikey, DSG. IMHO.

  • Charlie U.

    Anyone know what’s going on with the Chickenson/Alvarez step aside situation? Has the Jack fight been signed?

    • DRE

      Alvarez got tired waiting for Stevenson so we’re getting Alvarez vs Gvozdyk instead. Oh wait a sec…. OK Alvarez just punked from that one. Just like S. Barrera turned down the Kovalev fight because he thought the few hundred thousand wasn’t enough. Shit! C’mon guys.

  • DRE

    Loved Dougie’s idea of Tyson Fury broadcasting the Joshua-Fury fight. Of course we all know that Fury will just verbally slam anything that moves all the while talking like King Josh couldn’t have beaten Dr. Ruth.
    And to juice it up further Amir Khan can also guest star on the broadcasting table. Sounds like Amir’s really desperate for a job right now anyways.

  • Jeremy, UK

    Though it is positive that Okolie and Chamberlain are willing to risk their unbeaten records in such a competitive match early in their careers, there is a word of caution. Twice in recent years in similar circumstances, this early meeting of prospects has prevented the match happening at a more relevant stage when the anticipation and stakes would be much higher. I am referring to Groves v DeGale and BJ Saunders v Eubank Jr. Although I suppose better that they happened too early than not at all!

    • Teddy Reynoso

      Domestic rivalries is what is driving UK ,and even Japan, pro boxing and that is specifically what boxing in my native Philippines is sorely lacking for a long time now. Pinoy fight promoters and handlers are avoiding pitting their top wards against each other even at the early stages and more so when they are already rated internationally. Hence we have Nietes and Ancajas as world champions for a long time now not having fought a single fellow Filipino fighter despite of many of them being highly rated by world sanctioning bodies. In the 60s, Elorde, Barrientos and Adigue fought each other and Salavarria, Villlacampo and Magramo did the same.

      • Teddy Reynoso

        Hence we find ourselves in a paradoxical condition where Pinoy fighters are doing well internationally while local boxing back home is dying. How long we can sustain this is anybody’s guess. But one thing is sure, we may no longer have a domestic boxing industry to speak of if authorities do not address this sad state of affairs.

        • Jeremy, UK

          I suspect the problem is that they see the money being earned overseas by their Filipino superstars and want to follow suit. It’s a real shame that PacMan’s match v Horn took place in Australia rather than Manilla. That could’ve been a huge boost for your country’s boxing scene – plus the judges may have come to a better decision!

          • Teddy Reynoso

            Indeed.

  • Black Oracle

    I would rather see Khan vs Thurman, than Porter vs Thurman.

  • Teddy Reynoso

    Khan is just a fighter bidding to remain relevant in the world of pro boxing. He reminds me of Paulie Malignaggi and Zab Judah, both quick and talented fighters whose guts and daring were not equaled by their noted physical vulnerabilities. But despite that, Khan, Malignaggi and Judah still managed to accomplish a lot in their career, even winning a world title or two at the time when guys like Mayweather and Cotto were at their dominant best. All three knew/ know how to sell themselves and at sunder times, some people even believe in them, thanks also to their gift of gab. That could have convinced an astute matchmaker as Hearn and noted trainer as Hunter to take Khan in. That quality makes them extra ordinary and it would not be a stretch if one day, all three would even merit consideration in the Hall of Fame as they did their share in making pro boxing lively despite their physical shortcomings.

  • Teddy Reynoso

    We have seen Judah fought Tzsyu and Mayweather and Malignaggi fought Cotto. It would have been interesting to see how those two would have fared against another two greats of the era, Ricky Hatton and Shane Mosley.

  • Teddy Reynoso

    Tewa Kiram represents an improvement in Thai pro boxing as he is the first Thai to make it to the top of a world ranking in the welterweight although another Thai Sirimongkol Singwancha who had much earlier won world titles at super flyweight and super featherweight has been rated at super welterweight. Before, the highest weight division a Thai fighter had fought in and won a world title was at super lightweight through Saensak Muangsurin.

    • Teddy Reynoso

      Nevertheless, both Thailand and Japan which boast of producing more world champions than the Philippines, have not done what the Philippines has done in pro boxing—win legitimate world titles at middleweight (universal recognition) through Ceferino Garcia and welterweight (WBO) through Manny Pacquiao. The so called regular title held by Ryota Murata at middleweight is just a trinket given that Gennady Golovkin is the true world champion at 160.

  • Serving Soldier

    Wow.. I have never seen so many comments on a fighter mentioned in the mailbag ( Khan). What ever everyone’s opinion about him is, and there are gazillions below, he certainly generates interest and has staunch fans.

  • I’mnothere

    Not even one comment about that guy being called terdsak?! No wonder he learned to fight. Some parents….

    • philoe bedoe

      Lol……..

  • Teddy Reynoso

    Dougie, this is the nth time I have read you cited Humberto Gonzales shock loss to Saman Sorjaturong. Well it could be justified as you are talking of the capabilities of Thai fighters to pull off surprises. But at least you should have made the clarification that that was not the first time Chiquita had been upset beaten by an Asian as Pinoy fighter Rolando Pascua was the first to do it and in the process, debunked the myth of the Mexican’s superiority and invincibility.

    • I wasn’t covering boxing at the time (beyond an occasional freelance article here and there in local papers; plus one, on the reopening of the Olympic, in THE RING), so I really wasn’t up on all of Gonzalez’s history. All I know is, at the gym where I trained (and learned much about the sport), the LA Boxing Club, Chiquita was a legend. Sorjaturong was nobody. If any knew anything about him, it was that Finito iced him early. Nobody in L.A. thought Chiquita was going to lose that fight. The memory of the Mexican fans going silent inside the area sticks with me to this day.

  • ozzy

    Amazing how this terrible UK fighter, Khan, has dominated the whole of this mailbag LOL.